Monday Nov 21, at Mitchell Hall Room 385 on UWM Campus

RESERVATION REQUESTED  414.229.4947

Tomás Kubínek’s internationally acclaimed solo performances play to packed theaters around the world. After a sold-out run on Broadway, The New York Times lauded his work as “Absolutely expert!”

“Hilarious and enormously talented!” trumpeted England’s Time Out, after appearances at London’s Royal Festival Hall.

A collision of theatre and music-hall, his exuberant one-man show is equal parts comic brilliance, virtuosic vaudeville and irrresistible charm.

“Physical Poet and Verbal Acrobat!
Needless Risk-Taker…Professor of Fantastically Useless Inventions…Arduous Advocate of The Commonplace Miracle.
Certified Lunatic and Master of the Impossible…”

Tomás Kubínek – (toh-mawsh koo-bee-neck), was born in Prague and at the age of three was smuggled out of the country by his parents to escape the 1968 Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia.   http://www.kubinek.com

After two months in a refugee camp in Austria, the Kubínek family was granted asylum in Canada and it was there, in St. Catharines, Ontario, that Tomas, age 5, witnessed his first circus.

He became passionately interested in clowns, circus, theater and magic and his perplexed yet well-adjusted parents took him to see every show that passed through town.

At age 9 he presented his first performance before a circle of elderly magicians. By age 13 he had an agent. He performed in coffee-houses between folk-music acts and while still in his teens, he made his circus debut with a Brazilian clown duo as the rear half of a two-person horse. There was no turning back…

Working any and all jobs related to showbiz, the enterprising Mr. Kubínek was able to save money and travel to Europe to study with some of the world’s greatest teachers of theatre including; Monika Pagneaux, Pierre Byland, Jaques Lecoq and Boleslav Polivka.

These studies, combined with his own tireless experiments in the art of live performance, led to the creation of his award-winning solo stage shows which play to capacity crowds at theaters, international arts festivals, and in televison broadcasts throughout the world.

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