Archives for category: Auditions

jointauditions

Joint auditions for Bard & Bourbon’s

Julius Caesar (drunk) and The Tempest (drunk)

 

Auditions: Monday, January 28th 5:00pm-9:00pm – sign up at https://tinyurl.com/CaesarTempest  to reserve an audition time

Callbacks: Saturday, Feb 2nd 9am-12pm

 

If you attended Milwaukee General Auditions and performed a classical monologue, or have acted for Bard & Bourbon before, you do NOT need to attend initial auditions.  Instead, please email info@bardandbourbon.com to express interest in being considered for callbacks.

 

These productions will incorporate extensive double casting and nontraditional casting.  Actors of all ages, body types, genders, races, and physical abilities are encouraged to audition. Real alcohol will be consumed onstage. Non-drinking roles are available. 

 

Julius Caesar runs March 13-17

The Tempest runs May 22-26

 

Auditions will be held at the Underground Collaborative on the lower level of the Shops of Grand Avenue – 161 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53203.

Please prepare a classical monologue of no more than 2 minutes and bring a headshot and resume.  You may also be asked to read from the script.

Plan on arriving at least 10 minutes prior to your audition to sign in and fill out a short form.

 

For more information contact info@bardandbourbon.com

 

To sign up, visit https://tinyurl.com/CaesarTempest

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rep

The Milwaukee Generals are almost upon us, so I thought now would be a good time to revisit some thoughts on auditioning.  Here are my thoughts from a couple of years ago.  I’ve done a bit of judicial editing, but my thoughts on this process haven’t changed that much.  Hope it helps.

 

Fletcher

 

Having sat through the Milwaukee Generals for the last several years, I’ve come across all sorts of things that auditionees do which sabotage the work at hand.  I’m continually amazed by some of these gaffs, but to be fair, how could they know?  I understand just how hard and awful the process of auditioning is having been an actor for the last 35 years.  To that end I’ve decided to share some of the dos and don’ts of auditioning.  I throw in the caveat that these are strictly from my own viewpoint and that while they deal with auditioning in general, they are specific to the peculiarities of myself and the Milwaukee Generals.

 

I’m dividing this “tutorial” into three parts: the Introduction, the Headshot and Resume and the Audition.

 

The Introduction 

 

If you have the chance (and that’s a big if) take a peek at the room you are going to walk into ahead of time.  Auditioning is an intimidating thing and walking into a room blind is hateful.  Find out where the auditors are going to be sitting and figure out where you are going to sit or stand.  Find out if there is a chair available and what kind it is.  Nothing worse than preparing a piece that requires you to spin a chair around and sit on it backwards only to find out that the chair has arms.  For those of you new to the Milwaukee Generals, you are walking into a room to face a group of auditors in a horseshoe configuration. 

 

If you walk into the room and you find that there are auditors behind you, you’ve come in too far.  Back up so that we can see your face.

 

Take your time introducing yourself and your pieces.  Know that we are furiously passing your headshots around as quickly as we can, flipping them over and pouring over your resume and then trying to catch what pieces you are going to do and in many cases trying to jot that info down.  We see a lot of auditions over those couple of days and it’s extremely difficult to keep them straight.  Give us a chance to remember you.  I’ll never fault an auditionee for taking his or her time introducing their pieces.  When in doubt, wait until the majority of us have finished and are looking back up at you before you begin your first piece.

 

Don’t undress in the room.  This is a rather new phenomenon that has started happening lately.  When you walk into the room, be prepared to go.  I don’t want to see you come in, and then slowly take off a coat, scarf, shirt or any other item of clothing as you are introducing yourself.  That’s weird and distracting.  Leave that stuff outside.

 

This is for both your intro and exit; don’t apologize for your audition.  Look, you only get one shot at this, so no matter how poorly you’ve prepared or think you’ve done during the audition, do it boldly and with a smile on your face.  I can’t tell you how many people come into the room with the body language of, “Uh, hi.  I don’t really know why I’m here and I’m sorry to waste your time.”  Conversely I’ve seen a lot of people who have finished a perfectly fine audition and then ruin it by sheepishly excusing themselves on the way out.  Don’t do it!  It sucks all of the energy out of your audition.

 

Generally speaking, goofy introductions and/or exits will fall flat and have a good chance of being irritating.  I know it’s a defensive thing, but just don’t do it.  Come in, smile and introduce yourself.  When you are finished, say thank you.  Resist the urge to ask us if we have any questions or if there’s anything else we’d like to see.  Trust me; if we have those questions we won’t let you leave the room until we know the answers.

 

Give us the info we need.  It has become fashionable of late to name the play your audition is from, but not the part; or worse yet, not tell us anything at all.  This seems particularly true of Shakespeare.  Don’t make it a guessing game.  Conversely, don’t give us too much information.  In most cases I don’t need to know the author and I certainly don’t need to be told that Hamlet was written by Shakespeare.  And occasionally an auditionee will give us a summary of the piece they are about to give.  Nope, don’t do it.

 

While we are on the subject of introducing your pieces, proceed to do your pieces in the order in which they were introduced.  Different auditors are there for different reasons.  Shakespeare companies have less interest in your modern/comic piece and are waiting for the Macbeth you are going to do.  If you say you are going to do your classical piece second, do so.  They may use that brief period of time while you are performing your first piece to scan your resume and see what other classical pieces you have done and where.

 

Oftentimes the audition goes wrong during the intro.  I spend a whole day with my students having them do nothing but walking into a room and introducing themselves.  This is surprisingly difficult, and few people spend any time on that part of their audition.  Auditionees actually stumble over their names, forget what pieces they are doing, mispronounce the playwright’s name (which is just one more reason that info is unnecessary), mumble their info in such a way that we can’t understand it or turn their back and drag a chair across the room while making their intro.  Enter the room.  If you are going to use a chair make a decision; either get the chair, pick it up and set it where you want and then introduce yourself, or introduce yourself and then get set.  Trust me; we will welcome the extra time to look at your resume.

 

Unless we stand up and stick our hands out, no need to come over and shake our hands.  As I’ve stated, we’re going to a whole lot of people over the course of this very long day.  There are also upwards of twenty people in that room and you won’t want to shake all of our hands.

 

The Headshot and Resume 

 

Look like your headshot.  It’s bothersome when you don’t.  You’re a little heavier than you’d like to be?  So what.  Maybe we’re looking for just that heavy person.  It’s going to be very difficult to remember you later if you don’t look like your headshot.

 

Staple or glue your resume to your headshot.  I can’t tell you how irritating it is to get a loose resume.  Or worse yet, one in which the resume is paper-clipped to the headshot actually covering the headshot.  It does nothing but make you look unprofessional and your audition might fail right there before you even get in the room.  And take the time to trim it to fit.  I file these away and those odd sized ones just might not make it into my filing cabinet.

 

While we’re on the subject of attaching your resume, don’t attach anything else.  I’m really happy you’re currently employed with your one-man show, but I don’t want a flyer or postcard attached advertising said show.

 

Leave white space on your resume.  We’re doing everything we can to remember the interesting things about you in case we should want to cast you.  If you jamb-pack your resume from margin to margin we have no room for such notes.  It also makes them hard to read and smacks of desperation.  “Look how much I’ve done!”  We don’t need to know everything you’ve done and if you have stuff on there from twenty years ago you might think about some judicial editing.

 

Use a decent sized font.  We’re at this all day and my eyes get tired.  If you give me an 8 point font I’ll want to throw your resume in the discard pile then and there.  Also, weird or funny fonts are irritating.  It just adds an extra hurdle where I don’t need one.  And if you use comic sans I will throw your resume away.

 

There is a somewhat uniform way of setting up your resume.  Feel free to diverge, but just know that doing so will increase the likelihood that I won’t be able to find the info I’m looking for.  At the top should be your name and under that your vitals.  Height, weight, eye color, hair color, telephone and email address.  If you are a singer you may want to put your vocal range.  Do not give us your address.  In this day and age that simply isn’t safe and every now and then you send your resume to an unscrupulous person who turns around and sells your resume to other places.  Don’t include your age or tell us what your age range is.  That’s our job and why would you want to limit yourself that way?  Likewise, don’t include the dates of your productions.

 

Below your name and vitals should come the body of your resume which is your stage experience.  There are four things I want to know here: the theatre you worked at, the show you did, the part you played and who directed you.  Set them up in neat columns so that I can easily scan through them.  Don’t be afraid to list multiple shows with one theatre, that’s a good thing; that says that you worked at that theatre and they liked you enough to ask you back.  I am very leery of the auditionee that has 30 theatres listed and has only one show at each of them.

 

Below the stage experience section should be your education and special skills.  Still in high school?  It’s okay, we won’t hold it against you, so don’t be ashamed of it.  Tell us where you went to school and who some of your teachers were, but leave your GPA off.  Those names may open up a conversation.  I’m not really interested if you took a weekend class here or there.  Special skills should be special.  I don’t know how special having a driver’s license is.  Fire eating is more impressive (although at this last audition every other person had that listed) and I certainly want to know if you can speak a foreign language fluently.  I assume a good actor can learn dialects, so for me I don’t really care.

You may have a lot of film and/or TV credits; you may have a lot of directing credits.  I don’t care.  I’m here to audition stage actors.  In this day and age you should be able to have several different resumes at your disposal.  If you are coming to the Milwaukee Generals, cater your resume to your clients, which are almost exclusively theatres.

 

Have enough resumes.  We don’t like sharing.

 

Don’t lie on your resume.  You will be busted and then you’ve lost all credibility.  If you took a weekend class don’t make it sound like you received a degree.  If you took a beginning improv class don’t say you are part of the troope.  If you were Gregory in Romeo and Juliet once upon a time, don’t claim that you are a trained fighter.  You’re not.  We know, we always know.

 

The Audition 

 

So now we come to the heart of the matter.  First know that within the first ten or fifteen seconds we know if we like you or not.  Sometimes we’ve already made up our minds during the intro.  That’s just the way it goes.  Knowing that, limit the length of your pieces.  They really should be no longer than a minute a piece.  I spent one whole afternoon timing auditions.  I would look down at my watch when I started to lose interest and it was always between 55 and 65 seconds.  Even if you’re great, going beyond that is too much.  In the past, many people were going over three minutes and that was just for one of their pieces.  Leave us wanting more.

 

In picking your pieces be very selective.  If you choose something offensive it is likely to offend and turn off at least a few people in the room.  Have a really good reason for picking such a piece. Of course if you are still looking for a piece right now you are probably in trouble.

 

Don’t do stand up.  I’ve never seen it work and theatre is not stand up.  I’ve also never seen a piece that an actor has written for themselves work.

 

Contrast your pieces.  That doesn’t mean that one has to be modern comic and the other classical dramatic.  You can contrast two modern funny pieces and I will be quite delighted.  But standing during one and sitting during the other is not contrast.  Show us two different sides of yourself and hopefully those two pieces are different than your introduction.  Remember that your intro is a chance to show us a different side of yourself that will be contrasted by your two pieces.  Prove that you can act.

 

Don’t do serial killer monologues.  They are overdone and not usually all that interesting.

 

Don’t find a monologue in a monologue book.  They generally aren’t very good and they are overused.  Nothing like seeing the same bad monologue four times in the same day.  Read plays, lots of them, and find something that speaks to you.

 

People bend over backwards trying to find the obscure Shakespeare piece that no one has ever seen.  In doing so they generally go to some of Shakespeare’s lesser known plays.  You know why they are lesser known?  Because they’re not as good.  You know what I’ve never seen?  Someone audition with “To be or not to be.”

 

Don’t wear anything that is more disturbing or more interesting than you.  I’ll spend the whole audition wondering, “Why did he wear that?” instead of watching your audition.  Look nice, but make sure you are comfortable and can move around.  And unless you live in a suit and tie 24/7, don’t wear a suit and tie.  It always comes off as amateurish.

 

Your pieces should actually be scenes in which you are engaged in some kind of action as opposed to telling us a funny story.  I want to see your struggle, not your charming me with a funny anecdote.

 

Feel free to use me as your point of focus.  I will always sit in one of the corner seats for just that reason.  But know that not everyone is okay with that.  However, if you stand two feet in front of me and confront me, you’re going to lose me.  I’ll still stare straight at you and be the best audience member I can be, but I’m no longer really watching you.  I’m beginning to wonder if you’re crazy enough to jump the table and others in the room are concentrating on the same thing.

 

After you are done with a piece do not say scene.  Worse yet, do not wave your hand in front of your face and say scene.

 

Do make your transitions clear and clean.  Do something, usually a physical move, to let us know one piece has ended and the next has begun.  Of course if they are highly contrastable pieces, that shouldn’t be a problem.

 

If you have an emotional piece and are able to go to that place, good for you.  If you end that piece and take a long time coming out of it and composing yourself, showing us just how hard that was, I will no longer love you.

 

If you get off to a bad start ask if you can start over.  We will always say yes.

 

No props.  We’ll see the letter in your hand if you are invested in your scene.  And never, ever, ever…NEVER! bring a gun into the room.  Especially not one loaded with a half-charge blank which you then hold to your head and pull the trigger.  Sigh.  It now needs to be said.

 

And that’s my spiel.  I’m sure other things will come to mind and I’ll update this from time to time.  I also welcome observations from other auditors whether they agree with me or not.  Know that during the course of my stumbling career I have made many of these mistakes myself, and it was only because some kind person took me in hand that I got past some of them.  I’m still an awful auditionee.

 

Be bold and good luck.

 

Fletcher

 

P.S. The people in the room really want you to be good.  We’ve got a lot on our collective minds during the course of that very long day.  Please don’t read anything into our dour faces.  And know that if you come in with a bright smile and a chipper attitude we will immediately light up.


summit-players-660x440

Summit Players Theatre will be holding auditions for their 2019 summer Shakespeare in the State Parks tour of Romeo and Juliet on February 17th from 9am – 2pm.

We are looking to cast a diverse six member acting company who must be available for weekend and weekday evening rehearsals from mid-May to mid-June, and to tour weekends from June 14 through August 4th.

If you are interested and available, please send a picture and resume (or equivalent information) to maureen@summitplayerstheatre.com

All applicants for this energetic and physically demanding 75 minute production and accompanying workshops must be available for the entirety of the rehearsal and performance schedule.  If called in to audition, you will be contacted with an appointment time and venue location.

Details on audition criteria, rehearsal and performance schedule, and actor stipends can be found on our website:    https://www.summitplayerstheatre.com/opportunities 


AUDITION NOTICE: Hope Summer Rep is looking for Actors in Milwaukee for our 2019 Season. Sign up in link below.

Milwaukee, WI
February 14th 11-5pm

Location
Broadway Theatre Center

Actors
2 Contrasting 1 minute monologues One must be Shakespeare and One must be done w/British Accent.
32 Bars of any Musical Theatre song

*If you play an instrument, please bring it and be prepared to demonstrate skill level. Guitar, Banjo, Bass, Violin and Piano a plus. *Piano provided*

Any questions please email us at HSRTauditions@hope.edu More info on HSRT’s Season at www.hope.edu/hsrthope


5-curious savage google+

Auditions for THE CURIOUS SAVAGE at Sunset Playhouse, 700 Wall Street, Elm Grove, WI 53122, 262-782-4430 SunsetPlayhouse.com.

 

Monday, January 7 & Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Callbacks: Wednesday, January 9, 2019 (if necessary)

 

We hope to see you at the auditions. All roles are open.

 

THE CURIOUS SAVAGE will be directed by Dustin J. Martin. Auditions WILL consist of readings from the script.

 

Auditioners will be asked to fill out an Audition Information Sheet prior to auditions; one may fill this out the night of the auditions or ahead of time by downloading the Audition Sheet – THE CURIOUS SAVAGE at SunsetPlayhouse.com.

 

Rehearsals: Monday, January 21 – Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Tech Week is Friday, February 22 – Wednesday, February 27, 2019. You must be available for EVERY technical rehearsal (Friday before Opening through Preview Night) and EVERY performance to be cast in this show.

 

Performances: Thursday, February 28 – Sunday, March 17, 2019

For more information visit SunsetPlayhouse.com


Errors

Audition Notice for Shakespeare in the Park – 10th Anniversary Season

Optimist Theatre is accepting applications to audition for the 10th Anniversary the free Shakespeare in the Park production of The Comedy of Errors directed by ML Cogar and Ron Scot Fry.

Accepting submissions from both Equity and Non-Equity performers. Please email a current headshot and resume to Tom Reed at treed@optimisttheatre.org  for consideration.

Auditions will be January 26, 27, and 28th at Alverno College. Rehearsals begin May 13th. The Comedy of Errors opens June 27th and runs through July 13th for a total of 12 shows. Performances will be at the Peck Pavilion, adjacent to the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts. Optimist Theatre is a Resident Partner of the Marcus Center.

Optimist Theatre encourages performers of all ethnicities, gender identities, and ages to submit for an auditions slot. Under the auspices of Optimist Theatre’s Small Professional Theatre Company contract with Actors’ Equity Association, EMC award points are possible via participation in this production.


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Cooperative Performance

AUDITIONS  for “ALLUSION ILLUSION”

 

An immersive movement theater work looking for a wide range of actors and/or dancers who are comfortable working in a collaborative process.
Actors and dancers should be prepared to learn a short movement phrase, improvise, and work from a script given that evening.
Be prepared to stay the entire time, as this is a group audition.
Doors will open 15 minutes early for check in and warm up time. Performers of all adult ages, genders, and ethnicities are encouraged to audition. Non-equity.
Allusion/Illusion is co-created/directed by Andrea Burkholder, Daniel Burkholder, Kelly Coffey, and Don Russell and will be Performed February, 2019.
Rehearsals will begin in January 2019.
*Possible pay based on profit sharing
We look to rehearse 4 days a week (days based on maximum availability) all of January and leading up to the opening second or third week of February. The show is expected to run Fridays and Saturdays the last three weeks of February or the last two weekends of February and the first weekend of March. Performance space TBD

To confirm your audition please email kcoffey@cooperformke.com

When? Wednesday Dec 5 from 7-10pm.
*Be prepared to stay the entire time. Please wear clothing that you are comfortable moving in. No monologues required. You may be asked to read from a script.

Where? UWM Kenilworth Studio 660
East Kenilworth Place, 2155 N Prospect Ave 6th Floor, Milwaukee, WI 53202
(the entrance is located in the alley next to Urban Outfitters)

What if reality is a lie and the acceptance of it is so great by all of us that the opposing force can’t make itself known?
Weaving dance, movement, text, poetry and technology this project explores the conflict between what we perceive as reality (Illusion) and what is actually reality or what is alluded to beyond our senses.

We look forward to seeing you!
www.cooperativeperformance.org
(414) 533-7308

“Whatever is a reality today, whatever you touch and believe in and that seems real for you today, is going to be-like the reality of yesterday-an illusion tomorrow” Luigi Pirandello


Forward-Theater-Co

Forward Theater Company in Madison will hold its annual Equity auditions on Monday, December 3rd from 9:00am to 5:00pm at Overture Center for the Arts, 201 State Street, in Madison, WI. Auditions are for Forward Theater Company’s 2019–20 season (TBD), and are open to AEA and EMC actors only. Complete information on these auditions and how to reserve an appointment can be found at https://forwardtheater.com/learn/auditions.


4-a murder is announced
Sunset Playhouse, 700 Wall Street, Elm Grove, WI  53122  262-782-4430

A MURDER IS ANNOUNCED will be directed by Carol Dolphin. Auditions will consist of readings from the script.

Auditioners will be asked to fill out an Audition Information Sheet prior to auditions; one may fill this out the night of the auditions or ahead of time by visiting SunsetPlayhouse.com and downloading the form.

Auditions: Monday, November 12 – Tuesday, November 13, 2018 at 7:00 pm

Callbacks: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 (if necessary)

Rehearsals: Monday, November 26, 2018 – Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Performances: Thursday, January 17 – Saturday, February 2, 2019

 

Read further for a synopsis and character descriptions. Click here to see our other upcoming auditions!

Scripts are available for check-out at the box office for a $10 cash deposit. 

Box Office hours are Tuesdays 1 pm – 7 pm, Wednesdays-Fridays 1 pm – 5 pm, & Saturdays 1 pm- 4 pm

Contact Ann Mather at amather@sunsetplayhouse.com or 262-782-4431, ext 221 if you have any further questions or if you plan to arrive later than 8:30 pm for auditions.

 

Synopsis

An announcement in the local paper states the time and place of a murder to occur in Miss Blacklock’s Victorian house. The victim is not one of the home’s several occupants, but an unexpected and unknown visitor. What follows is a classic Christie puzzle of mixed motives, concealed identities, a second death, a determined Inspector grimly following the twists and turns, and Miss Marple on hand to provide the solution, at some risk to herself, in a dramatic confrontation just before the final curtain.

Characters – A MURDER IS ANNOUNCED
(British accent required unless otherwise noted.)

MALE: 

PATRICK SIMMONS:  Julia’s brother, good looking, smooth, a few years older than Julia. late 20’s and up.

EDMUCH SWETTENHAM:  Mrs. Swettenham’s son, privileged, earnest, fledgling writer, mid 20’s to mid 30’s

RUDI SCHERZ: Strongly built, commanding voice, Swiss/German or Swiss/Italian accent (cameo role)

INSPECTOR CRADDOCK: The chief inspector of the case, in control, rational, 50’s – 60’s.  There is good chemistry between Craddock and Miss Marple.

SERGEANT MELLORS; Craddock’s helper, could be any age or type (a small role)

FEMALE:

JULIA SIMMONS; Attractive, sweet, unmarried, mid 20’s

LETITIA BLACKLOCK; Sophisticated, monied, still attractive, “beyond middle age,” never married. Owner of Chipping Cleghorn, scene of the play

DORA BRUNNER (BUNNY): Long time friend of Letitia, slightly older, a bit dotty and confused

MITZI: The cook/maid middle European (with Hungarian or Slavic accent), an explosive character, mid 20’s to mid 40s, emotional and melodramatic

MISS MARPLE: The famous Christie character, 60’s or older, quick witted.  (She might be any body type – no preconceived requirements here)

PHILLIPA HAYMES: Elegant, classy appearance, sophisticated, mid 20’s, a widow with a small son

MRS. SWETTENHAM: One of the grand dames of the area; sophisticated, haughty, mid 40’s to 50’s

 

**Rehearsal times are subject to change based on availability of cast but are generally 5 nights a week from 6:30 -10:00 pm. (Generally, Sunday – Thursday) You must be available for EVERY technical rehearsal (Friday before Opening through Preview Night) and EVERY performance to be cast in this show.

 

 


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The 2019 Non-Equity Milwaukee General Auditions will take place on Monday, January 21st, 2019, from 8:45am to 6:00pm, at Milwaukee Repertory Theater.  This is a locals only audition – only adult-aged, Milwaukee-based, non-union professional actors who do not require assistance with travel and housing should attend.

THE SIGN-UP PROCESS

Due to the continued high demand for these audition slots, we will again implement the lottery system used last year:

  • The lottery will be conducted for this year’s audition and waiting list slots.   There is an in-person component to this process in order to maintain focus on local talent.
  • Actors who auditioned in the 2018 Milwaukee General Auditions will not be allowed to do so in 2019. Actors who auditioned in 2017 are eligible to do so again in 2019.
  • Actors enrolled in college or university and in their final semester of study before graduation at the time of the auditions will be eligible to attend.  All other student actors must wait until they meet this requirement.
  • Actors born after January 21st, 2001 are not eligible to audition.

On Saturday December 15th, 2018, interested actors will be able submit their respective Non-Equity Milwaukee General Auditions Lottery Entry Forms outside of Milwaukee Repertory Theater’s  Stackner Cabaret https://www.milwaukeerep.com/Plan-Your-Visit/Directions–Parking/ on the 2nd floor atrium of the Patty & Jay Baker Theater Complex, accessible via elevator or via the escalator near building security.

Lottery forms are available for download here in advance of these auditions so that interested actors may download, print, and complete them in advance of the lottery day.  Paper copies of the form will not be made available on the day of the lottery.  Lottery Entry Forms must be downloaded, printed, and completed in advance.  Interested actors must also present a valid form of photo identification (driver’s license or state-issued identification is recommended) in order to submit their lottery entry.  In addition, please note that an individual is eligible to submit one Lottery Entry only, and only for oneself-entries made for other individuals will not be accepted.

 

 

 

Here are the specifics of the sign-up process that will take place on December 15th, 2018:

  • From 8:30a to 9:30a, Lottery Entry Forms will be validated and accepted.
  • At 9:30a, the Lottery will take place. Participating actors must be present to accept a slot resulting from a Lottery Entry.  If your name is called and you are not present, your entry will be forfeited.
  • As Lottery Entries are drawn, that actor will have the opportunity to sign up for a remaining available Audition or Waiting List slot. Entries will be processed in the order in which they are drawn.

There will be 10 Waiting List slots available.  Sign-up for these slots will occur in the same manner as outlined above once all auditions slot have been filled.  Obtaining a Waiting List slot does not guarantee an audition, but preference for any slots that open (due to cancellation, for example, at a later date) will be given to those actors on the Waiting List. As we have streamlined this process over the last few years, we now recommend any interested actors on the Wait List come to the auditions in the very likely case we are running ahead of schedule and are able to offer a slot in the moment. Please note that this is not a guarantee of being seen.

PREPARING FOR THE AUDITIONS

Audition slots will be 4 minutes long, and will consist of any two of the following:

  • One contemporary monologue
  • One classical monologue (preferably Shakespeare)
  • One musical theater selection – 60 to 90 seconds in duration. An accompanist will be in attendance.

Please note that the actor’s introduction and any time necessary to communicate with the accompanist will count as part of the 4 minutes.  Please prepare and time your selections carefully, as actors who exceed the audition time of 4 minutes will be stopped.

Actors should plan to bring 35 headshots/resumes that must be neatly stapled back to back prior to the audition date. (Please no paperclips or loose paper.) Actors who choose to audition with a musical theater selection and desire accompaniment should come prepared with sheet music arranged in a way that will be easy for our accompanist to read.

All actors must check in 30 minutes prior to their scheduled audition times. This will allow the auditions to move forward with fewer interruptions.

Questions?  Please email Dylan K. Sladky, Artistic Administrator, at dsladky@milwaukeerep.com.  Due to the volume of questions, please allow two business days for a response.

All interested actors should visit this page regularly for information and updates.

2019 Non-Union Milwaukee General Auditions

Lottery Entry Form

Name:                                                                                                                                                                                                 

Address:                                                                                                                                                                                             

                                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                                                               

Phone number:                                                                                                               

Phone type:                       O Mobile            O Home              O Work                (Check one)

Email Address:                                                                                                                                                                                 

By submitting this lottery form for the 2019 Milwaukee General Auditions, I hereby acknowledge the following:

  • I understand that submission of this form does not guarantee an audition slot or a waiting list slot in the 2019 Milwaukee General Auditions.
  • I was born before January 21st, 2001.
  • I will not be enrolled in college or university as of June 2019.
  • I am a resident of the Greater Milwaukee area.
  • I did not audition in the 2018 Milwaukee General Auditions.
  • I am not a member of Actors’ Equity Association.

Signature:                                                                                                                                                                          

Date:                                                                                                    

 

 

The 17th Annual

Milwaukee General Auditions

January 21st, 2019