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Part-Time Stage Manager – Kohl’s Wild Theater

 

Join the Zoological Society of Milwaukee’s (ZSM) award winning professional theater program. Kohl’s Wild Theater (KWT) is a live, interactive, participatory theater–directed primarily to children–that uses drama, puppetry, humor and songs to help inspire children to 1) care more about our natural world, 2) learn ways to help animals here and around the world, and 3) take action to make a difference.

POSITION DESCRIPTION

The Part-Time Stage Manager (SM) will lead teams of actors for daily performances at the Milwaukee County Zoo and on tour as part of the Kohl’s Wild Theater outreach program. This position reports to the full-time KWT Production Stage Manager.

Responsibilities include:

  • Managing the daily performance schedule.
  • Primary representative of KWT and the ZSM to performance venues.
  • Organize and maintain all technical equipment used during a performance.
  • Liaison from the KWT professional actors to KWT management.
  • Primary driver of company vehicle to performance venues.
  • Operate sound equipment during performances.

REQUIREMENTS

Two years of professional training in stage management, technical theater, arts management, or related field is required. Undergraduate degree in stage management preferred. 1-2 years of professional stage management experience a plus.

  • Strong organizational skills.
  • Excellent verbal communication with venue representatives and co-workers.
  • Leadership qualities to effectively manage a team.
  • Familiarity with Q-Lab software (both audio and video) is a plus.
  • Must be able to lift up to 50 lbs. without assistance. Lifting responsibilities include setting up technical equipment for performances such as set pieces and a sound system.
  • Experience working in multiple areas of technical theater, including carpentry, costumes and sound board operation.
  • Availability to work 2-5 days per week with irregular shift times, including weekends.
  • Must have your own vehicle, valid driver’s license and auto insurance.
  • International applicants must be legally authorized to work in the United States without Zoological Society sponsorship.

Start date: Late April, 2017. Start date is negotiable.

Hours: Approximately 18-24 hours per week after training and rehearsals. Most shifts are 4-5 hours long and occur between the hours of 6:30 AM and 6:30 PM. Shifts occur on both weekdays and weekends. Some shifts will be scheduled for evening hours. Work schedules are determined at least four weeks in advance. The stage management team can work around reasonable conflicts provided with four weeks’ notice.

APPLICATION PROCESS

  1. Email cover letter and resume to Reva Fox, KWT Production Stage Manager at revaf@zoosociety.org. In the subject line write “KWT SM Position” by February 17th, 2017.
  2. Qualified applicants will be contacted for interviews to be held from March 6th-10th, 2017.

 

 

 

 

Dave McLellan

Theater Coordinator

Zoological Society of Milwaukee

10005 West Bluemound Road
Milwaukee, WI 53226

Phone: 414-258-5058 x429

Cell: 414-254-9936

Fax: 414-258-4004

wildtheater.org

 


fruition

TICKETS: $20 general , $10 student (with ID) at the Door
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fruition-of-a-delusion-tickets-30891630699

Fruition of a Delusion follows Ruby on her quirky quest to solve the world’s energy crisis with the help of some popular scientists!
An original work presented by Cooperative Performance on:
Feb.10-11 at 8pm (Fri&Sat)
Feb 17-18 at 8pm (Fri&Sat)
Feb 24 at 8pm (Friday)
Feb 25 at 3pm AND 8pm (Saturday)
This unique performance will be held at Marquette University’s Opus College of Engineering’s visualization lab, MARVL, in room #028 on the lower level of the Engineering Hall, 1637 W. Wisconsin Ave.
~ 3D GLASSES will be provided to audiences for a fully immersive magical fantasy experience told with text, music, movement and a RUBE GOLDBERG machine.
*Due to LIMITED SEATING, pre-ordering tickets is recommended. For more information, visit www.cooperformke.com
Location:
Engineering Hall, Marquette University
1637 W Wisconsin Ave
Room #028
Milwaukee, WI 53233
**Street Parking
TICKETS: $20 general , $10 student (with ID)


aiphighres

All In Productions is pleased to announce auditions for its production of CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION, taking place at the Alchemist Theatre. Show dates are April 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14 and 15, with rehearsals beginning in February. The show is being directed by Mitch Weindorf.

 

Please read the below information to prepare for auditions. To schedule an audition time, email allin.mke@gmail.com and you will be assigned a timeslot. Audition videos can also be emailed to allin.mke@gmail.com, but must be turned in by February 6th.
DATE/TIME/LOCATION:

 

Wednesday, February 8

Underground Collaborative at Grand Avenue Mall

5:30 – 8:00 PM

(If necessary, callbacks will be held at 8:30)

 

DESCRIPTION:

 

When four lost New Englanders who enroll in Marty’s six-week-long community-center drama class begin to experiment with harmless games, hearts are quietly torn apart, and tiny wars of epic proportions are waged and won. A beautifully crafted diorama, a petri dish in which we see, with hilarious detail and clarity, the antic sadness of a motley quintet.

 

ROLES:

LAUREN (Female – Teenager): A loner. Definitely the outsider in the group – prefers being apart from the group, yet with a deep inner curiosity. Rough around the edges, but wants to succeed. Not aloof, just doesn’t know how to connect. Dreams of being an actor. Deep heart. Can be any ethnicity.

 

MARTY (Female – Late 40s-Early 60s): The teacher of the class. A bit of an earth mother quality, she believes in the power of vulnerability and connection that this work can bring. A natural leader, super comfortable in her skin. Unconventional. Has secrets. Married to James, and in a rocky patch.

 

JAMES (Male – Mid 50s-Late 60s): Outdoorsy, a previous Berkeley hippie now living in Vermont. Married to Marty, they are in a rocky patch which is making it harder for him to be vulnerable in the class, though he wants to participate. An introvert and people pleaser, has a rich imagination he is not used to sharing. Think Lands End.

 

SCHULTZ (Male – Mid 30s-Late 40s):
Recently divorced, puppy-dog sweet, and painfully needy. He exudes loneliness, lifelong hurt and resentment toward those men who have all the luck with women. Schulz is an endearing and slightly bumbling, and a would-be artistic furniture maker. He is recently on his own after a painful divorce, searching for something more not only in his activities, but in another woman.

 

THERESA (Female – Early 30s-Late30s):
Voluptuous, conflicted, flirtatious, warm and buoyant, and a former actress who has just moved to this small Vermont town, fleeing New York and a toxic relationship. Through Theresa’s uncertainty and anger over past hurts, we see how the acting exercises do, indeed, break down barriers

 

PREPARATION:

Please prepare one 1-minute, contemporary monologue in the style of the show. Callbacks will be held if necessary. Please bring a headshot and resume to your audition.

 


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The Milwaukee Generals are almost upon us, so I thought now would be a good time to revisit some thoughts on auditioning.  Here are my thoughts from a couple of years ago.  I’ve done a bit of judicial editing, but my thoughts on this process haven’t changed that much.  Hope it helps.

 

Fletcher

 

Having sat through the Milwaukee Generals for the last several years, I’ve come across all sorts of things that auditionees do which sabotage the work at hand.  I’m continually amazed by some of these gaffs, but to be fair, how could they know?  I understand just how hard and awful the process of auditioning is having been an actor for the last 35 years.  To that end I’ve decided to share some of the dos and don’ts of auditioning.  I throw in the caveat that these are strictly from my own viewpoint and that while they deal with auditioning in general, they are specific to the peculiarities of myself and the Milwaukee Generals.

 

I’m dividing this “tutorial” into three parts: the Introduction, the Headshot and Resume and the Audition.

 

The Introduction 

 

If you have the chance (and that’s a big if) take a peek at the room you are going to walk into ahead of time.  Auditioning is an intimidating thing and walking into a room blind is hateful.  Find out where the auditors are going to be sitting and figure out where you are going to sit or stand.  Find out if there is a chair available and what kind it is.  Nothing worse than preparing a piece that requires you to spin a chair around and sit on it backwards only to find out that the chair has arms.  For those of you new to the Milwaukee Generals, you are walking into a room to face a group of auditors in a horseshoe configuration. 

 

If you walk into the room and you find that there are auditors behind you, you’ve come in too far.  Back up so that we can see your face.

 

Take your time introducing yourself and your pieces.  Know that we are furiously passing your headshots around as quickly as we can, flipping them over and pouring over your resume and then trying to catch what pieces you are going to do and in many cases trying to jot that info down.  We see a lot of auditions over those couple of days and it’s extremely difficult to keep them straight.  Give us a chance to remember you.  I’ll never fault an auditionee for taking his or her time introducing their pieces.  When in doubt, wait until the majority of us have finished and are looking back up at you before you begin your first piece.

 

Don’t undress in the room.  This is a rather new phenomenon that has started happening lately.  When you walk into the room, be prepared to go.  I don’t want to see you come in, and then slowly take off a coat, scarf, shirt or any other item of clothing as you are introducing yourself.  That’s weird and distracting.  Leave that stuff outside.

 

This is for both your intro and exit; don’t apologize for your audition.  Look, you only get one shot at this, so no matter how poorly you’ve prepared or think you’ve done during the audition, do it boldly and with a smile on your face.  I can’t tell you how many people come into the room with the body language of, “Uh, hi.  I don’t really know why I’m here and I’m sorry to waste your time.”  Conversely I’ve seen a lot of people who have finished a perfectly fine audition and then ruin it by sheepishly excusing themselves on the way out.  Don’t do it!  It sucks all of the energy out of your audition.

 

Generally speaking, goofy introductions and/or exits will fall flat and have a good chance of being irritating.  I know it’s a defensive thing, but just don’t do it.  Come in, smile and introduce yourself.  When you are finished, say thank you.  Resist the urge to ask us if we have any questions or if there’s anything else we’d like to see.  Trust me; if we have those questions we won’t let you leave the room until we know the answers.

 

Give us the info we need.  It has become fashionable of late to name the play your audition is from, but not the part; or worse yet, not tell us anything at all.  This seems particularly true of Shakespeare.  Don’t make it a guessing game.  Conversely, don’t give us too much information.  In most cases I don’t need to know the author and I certainly don’t need to be told that Hamlet was written by Shakespeare.  And occasionally an auditionee will give us a summary of the piece they are about to give.  Nope, don’t do it.

 

While we are on the subject of introducing your pieces, proceed to do your pieces in the order in which they were introduced.  Different auditors are there for different reasons.  Shakespeare companies have less interest in your modern/comic piece and are waiting for the Macbeth you are going to do.  If you say you are going to do your classical piece second, do so.  They may use that brief period of time while you are performing your first piece to scan your resume and see what other classical pieces you have done and where.

 

Oftentimes the audition goes wrong during the intro.  I spend a whole day with my students having them do nothing but walking into a room and introducing themselves.  This is surprisingly difficult, and few people spend any time on that part of their audition.  Auditionees actually stumble over their names, forget what pieces they are doing, mispronounce the playwright’s name (which is just one more reason that info is unnecessary), mumble their info in such a way that we can’t understand it or turn their back and drag a chair across the room while making their intro.  Enter the room.  If you are going to use a chair make a decision; either get the chair, pick it up and set it where you want and then introduce yourself, or introduce yourself and then get set.  Trust me; we will welcome the extra time to look at your resume.

 

Unless we stand up and stick our hands out, no need to come over and shake our hands.  As I’ve stated, we’re going to a whole lot of people over the course of this very long day.  There are also upwards of twenty people in that room and you won’t want to shake all of our hands.

 

The Headshot and Resume 

 

Look like your headshot.  It’s bothersome when you don’t.  You’re a little heavier than you’d like to be?  So what.  Maybe we’re looking for just that heavy person.  It’s going to be very difficult to remember you later if you don’t look like your headshot.

 

Staple or glue your resume to your headshot.  I can’t tell you how irritating it is to get a loose resume.  Or worse yet, one in which the resume is paper-clipped to the headshot actually covering the headshot.  It does nothing but make you look unprofessional and your audition might fail right there before you even get in the room.  And take the time to trim it to fit.  I file these away and those odd sized ones just might not make it into my filing cabinet.

 

While we’re on the subject of attaching your resume, don’t attach anything else.  I’m really happy you’re currently employed with your one-man show, but I don’t want a flyer or postcard attached advertising said show.

 

Leave whitespace on your resume.  We’re doing everything we can to remember the interesting things about you in case we should want to cast you.  If you jamb-pack your resume from margin to margin we have no room for such notes.  It also makes them hard to read and smacks of desperation.  “Look how much I’ve done!”  We don’t need to know everything you’ve done and if you have stuff on there from twenty years ago you might think about some judicial editing.

 

Use a decent sized font.  We’re at this all day and my eyes get tired.  If you give me an 8 point font I’ll want to throw your resume in the discard pile then and there.  Also, weird or funny fonts are irritating.  It just adds an extra hurdle where I don’t need one.  And if you use comic sans I will throw your resume away.

 

There is a somewhat uniform way of setting up your resume.  Feel free to diverge, but just know that doing so will increase the likelihood that I won’t be able to find the info I’m looking for.  At the top should be your name and under that your vitals.  Height, weight, eye color, hair color, telephone and email address.  If you are a singer you may want to put your vocal range.  Do not give us your address.  In this day and age that simply isn’t safe and every now and then you send your resume to an unscrupulous person who turns around and sells your resume to other places.  Don’t include your age or tell us what your age range is.  That’s our job and why would you want to limit yourself that way?  Likewise, don’t include the dates of your productions.

 

Below your name and vitals should come the body of your resume which is your stage experience.  There are four things I want to know here: the theatre you worked at, the show you did, the part you played and who directed you.  Set them up in neat columns so that I can easily scan through them.  Don’t be afraid to list multiple shows with one theatre, that’s a good thing; that says that you worked at that theatre and they liked you enough to ask you back.  I am very leery of the auditionee that has 30 theatres listed and has only one show at each of them.

 

Below the stage experience section should be your education and special skills.  Still in high school?  It’s okay, we won’t hold it against you, so don’t be ashamed of it.  Tell us where you went to school and who some of your teachers were, but leave your GPA off.  Those names may open up a conversation.  I’m not really interested if you took a weekend class here or there.  Special skills should be special.  I don’t know how special having a driver’s license is.  Fire eating is more impressive (although at this last audition every other person had that listed) and I certainly want to know if you can speak a foreign language fluently.  I assume a good actor can learn dialects, so for me I don’t really care.

You may have a lot of film and/or TV credits; you may have a lot of directing credits.  I don’t care.  I’m here to audition stage actors.  In this day and age you should be able to have several different resumes at your disposal.  If you are coming to the Milwaukee Generals, cater your resume to your clients, which are almost exclusively theatres.

 

Have enough resumes.  We don’t like sharing.

 

Don’t lie on your resume.  You will be busted and then you’ve lost all credibility.  If you took a weekend class don’t make it sound like you received a degree.  If you took a beginning improv class don’t say you are part of the troope.  If you were Gregory in Romeo and Juliet once upon a time, don’t claim that you are a trained fighter.  You’re not.  We know, we always know.

 

The Audition 

 

So now we come to the heart of the matter.  First know that within the first ten or fifteen seconds we know if we like you or not.  Sometimes we’ve already made up our minds during the intro.  That’s just the way it goes.  Knowing that, limit the length of your pieces.  They really should be no longer than a minute a piece.  I spent one whole afternoon timing auditions.  I would look down at my watch when I started to lose interest and it was always between 55 and 65 seconds.  Even if you’re great, going beyond that is too much.  In the past, many people were going over three minutes and that was just for one of their pieces.  Leave us wanting more.

 

In picking your pieces be very selective.  If you choose something offensive it is likely to offend and turn off at least a few people in the room.  Have a really good reason for picking such a piece. Of course if you are still looking for a piece right now you are probably in trouble.

 

Don’t do stand up.  I’ve never seen it work and theatre is not stand up.  I’ve also never seen a piece that an actor has written for themselves work.

 

Contrast your pieces.  That doesn’t mean that one has to be modern comic and the other classical dramatic.  You can contrast two modern funny pieces and I will be quite delighted.  But standing during one and sitting during the other is not contrast.  Show us two different sides of yourself and hopefully those two pieces are different than your introduction.  Remember that your intro is a chance to show us a different side of yourself that will be contrasted by your two pieces.  Prove that you can act.

 

Don’t do serial killer monologues.  They are overdone and not usually all that interesting.

 

Don’t find a monologue in a monologue book.  They generally aren’t very good and they are overused.  Nothing like seeing the same bad monologue four times in the same day.  Read plays, lots of them, and find something that speaks to you.

 

People bend over backwards trying to find the obscure Shakespeare piece that no one has ever seen.  In doing so they generally go to some of Shakespeare’s lesser known plays.  You know why they are lesser known?  Because they’re not as good.  You know what I’ve never seen?  Someone audition with “To be or not to be.”

 

Don’t wear anything that is more disturbing or more interesting than you.  I’ll spend the whole audition wondering, “Why did he wear that?” instead of watching your audition.  Look nice, but make sure you are comfortable and can move around.  And unless you live in a suit and tie 24/7, don’t wear a suit and tie.  It always comes off as amateurish.

 

Your pieces should actually be scenes in which you are engaged in some kind of action as opposed to telling us a funny story.  I want to see your struggle, not your charming me with a funny anecdote.

 

Feel free to use me as your point of focus.  I will always sit in one of the corner seats for just that reason.  But know that not everyone is okay with that.  However, if you stand two feet in front of me and confront me, you’re going to lose me.  I’ll still stare straight at you and be the best audience member I can be, but I’m no longer really watching you.  I’m beginning to wonder if you’re crazy enough to jump the table and others in the room are concentrating on the same thing.

 

After you are done with a piece do not say scene.  Worse yet, do not wave your hand in front of your face and say scene.

 

Do make your transitions clear and clean.  Do something, usually a physical move, to let us know one piece has ended and the next has begun.  Of course if they are highly contrastable pieces, that shouldn’t be a problem.

 

If you have an emotional piece and are able to go to that place, good for you.  If you end that piece and take a long time coming out of it and composing yourself, showing us just how hard that was, I will no longer love you.

 

If you get off to a bad start ask if you can start over.  We will always say yes.

 

No props.  We’ll see the letter in your hand if you are invested in your scene.  And never, ever, ever…NEVER! bring a gun into the room.  Especially not one loaded with a half-charge blank which you then hold to your head and pull the trigger.  Sigh.  It now needs to be said.

 

And that’s my spiel.  I’m sure other things will come to mind and I’ll update this from time to time.  I also welcome observations from other auditors whether they agree with me or not.  Know that during the course of my stumbling career I have made many of these mistakes myself, and it was only because some kind person took me in hand that I got past some of them.  I’m still an awful auditionee.

 

Be bold and good luck.

 

Fletcher

 

P.S. The people in the room really want you to be good.  We’ve got a lot on our collective minds during the course of that very long day.  Please don’t read anything into our dour faces.  And know that if you come in with a bright smile and a chipper attitude we will immediately light up.


coop

Cooperative Performance Milwaukee is putting out a call for scripts for our second annual One Act Festival this upcoming June, but we need your help! Have a short you’ve been working on? Some original dance or movement composition you’d love to stage? Something else bold and exciting? We are taking submissions for one act scripts, dance, and movement pieces. These pieces are ideally between 10-15 minutes in length each and submissions are open to anyone from the Milwaukee theatre community and beyond. We want to hear what our talented artists have to offer so submit and spread the word!

 

If you would like your work to be included for consideration, don’t be shy! 
Please submit all works to: submissions@cooperformke.com. 
Don’t have an original work but have a burning desire to direct a part of the festival? E-mail us that too! Final submissions are ‪due by January 29th, 2017. More information on dates and locations to come!


scoundrels

Round 2!! — AUDITIONS FOR DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS the musical. We will be holding a second round of auditions to allow those who were unable to join us for Round 1 due to other commitments, weather, and holidays. We look forward to seeing you!!

 

DIRECTED BY LINDSEY ERIN

PRODUCED BY LAKE COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE

Please note you must be 16+ in age for this production.

 

Audition dates (sign up for 1 group)

Sunday, January 8: 1pm-3pm

Monday, January 9: 7pm-9pm

SIGN UP FOR AN AUDITION TIME HERE:  http://www.signupgenius.com/go/10c054aaaa92ea4fc1-dirty

 

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/223948684682280/?notif_t=plan_user_joined&notif_id=1483300802495374

 

We will take people in the order they arrive, and you will be released as soon as your audition is complete. If you have a day-of conflict, please notify us via email or phone and arrive during any of the available groups.

 

For auditions, please prepare 1 musical theatre song (16-32 bars) to be sung either accapella or with our provided piano accompanist (please bring music for the accompanist!). If you are able to prepare a 90 second comedy monologue, great! If not, that’s okay, we will have a monologue from the script provided for you when you arrive. Additionally, if you have an acting resume and recent picture, please bring it! If you don’t, that’s okay! We can talk about your expereince at the audition.

 

Auditions & Callbacks will be held the First Congregation United Church of Christ (across the street from LCP): 111 Church St, Hartland, WI 53029. Come around to the back of the church and enter through the door and head down stairs. A sign will be posted.

 

Please note that those asked to attend callbacks will be notified by January 10. Callback invitation or pass does not determine final casting decisions. All who auditioned will be notified of final casting decisions no later than January 14 unless notified otherwise. Callbacks will be on Wednesday January 11, from 6:30pm-9:30pm. Instructions will be sent in an email.

 

Time Commitment:

General Rehearsals, 6:30-9:30pm Mon-Thurs in February and March. First day of rehearsal is now February 6, 2017.  

Performances, 7:30pm shows: March 24, 25, 30, 31, April 1, 6, 7, 8

Performances, 2pm shows: March 26, April 2, 8, 9

 

If you have any additional questions, please contact Director Lindsey Erin at lindseyerin1216@gmail.com. Description of the characters can be found on the Facebook Audition Event Page. THANK YOU and we look forward to seeing you at auditions!


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Non-Union Milwaukee General Audtions

The 2017 Non-Union Milwaukee General Auditions will take place on Monday, January 30th, 2017, from 8:45am to 5:00pm, at Milwaukee Repertory Theater.  This is a locals only audition – only adult-aged, Milwaukee-based, non-union professional actors who do not require assistance with travel and housing should attend.

THE SIGN-UP PROCESS
We will again implement the lottery system used last year, due to the continued high demand for these audition slots:

  • The lottery will be conducted for this year’s audition and waiting list slots.   There will still be an in-person component to this process, in order to maintain focus on local talent.
  • Actors who auditioned in the 2016 Milwaukee General Auditions will not be allowed to do so in 2017.  At this time, we anticipate that actors who auditioned in 2016 will be eligible to do so again in 2018.
  • Actors enrolled in college or university and in their final semester of study before graduation at the time of the auditions will be eligible to attend.  All other student actors must wait until they meet this requirement.
  • Actors born after January 30th, 1999 are not eligible to audition.

On Saturday January 7th, 2017 at 9:30a, interested actors will be able submit their respective Non-Union Milwaukee General Auditions Lottery Entry Forms outside of Milwaukee Repertory Theater’s Stackner Cabaret on the 2nd floor Arboretum of the Patty & Jay Baker Theater Complex, accessible via elevator or via the escalator near building security.

Lottery forms are available for download here in advance of these auditions, so that interested actors may download, print, and complete them in advance of the lottery day.  Paper copies of the form will not be made available on the day of the lottery.  Lottery Entry Forms must be downloaded, printed, and completed in advance.  Interested actors must also present a valid form of photo identification (driver’s license or state-issued identification is recommended) in order to submit her/his lottery entry.  In addition, please note that an individual is eligible to submit one Lottery Entry only, and only for oneself – entries made for other individuals will not be accepted.

Here are the specifics of the sign-up process that will take place on January 7th, 2017:

  •  From 8:30a to 9:30a, Lottery Entry Forms will be validated and accepted.
  •  At 9:30a, the Lottery will take place.  Participating actors must be present to accept a slot resulting from a winning Lottery Entry.  If your name is called and you are not present, your winning entry will be forfeit.
  • As winning Lottery Entries are drawn, that actor will have the opportunity to sign up for a remaining available Audition or Waiting List slot.  Winning entries will be processed in the order in which they are drawn.

There will also be 10 Waiting List slots available.  Sign-up for these slots will occur in the same manner as outlined above, once all auditions slot have been filled.  Obtaining a Waiting List slot does not guarantee an audition, but preference for any slots that open (due to cancellation, for example) at a later date will be given to those actors on the Waiting List.

PREPARING FOR THE AUDITIONS
Audition slots will be 4 minutes long, and will consist of any two of the following:

  • One contemporary monologue
  • One classical monologue (preferably Shakespeare)
  • One musical theater selection – 60 to 90 seconds in duration.  An accompanist will be in attendance.

Please note that the actor’s introduction and any time necessary to communicate with the accompanist will count as part of the 4 minutes.  Please prepare and time your selections carefully, as actors who exceed the audition time of 4 minutes will be stopped.

Non-Equity actors should plan to bring 30 headshots/resumes and should be neatly staples back-to-back prior to the audition date. Actors who choose to audition with a musical theater selection and desire accompaniment should come prepared with sheet music.

Questions?  Please email Dylan K. Sladky, Artistic Administrator, at dsladky@milwaukeerep.com.  Due to the volume of questions, please allow two business days for a response.

All interested actors should visit this page regularly for information and updates. 

COMPANIES INTERESTED IN ATTENDING
(updated December 7
th, 2016)

The Alchemist Theatre –
The Bunny Gumbo Theater Company –
Milwaukee Chamber Theatre –
American Player’s Theatre –
Next Act –
Milwaukee Repertory Theater –
Milwaukee Comedy –
All In Productions –
Actor’s Craft Seventh Avenue Theatre –
Theatre RED –
Third Avenue Playhouse –
Cooperative Performance Milwaukee –
First Stage Children’s Theatre –
Fireside Theatre –
Bronzeville Arts Ensemble –
Theatre LILA –
Quasimondo Milwaukee Physical Theatre –
Children’s Theater of Madison –
Forward Theater Company –
In Tandem Theatre –
Lori Lins Talent –
Renaissance Theaterworks –
Solstice Theatre –
The Third Avenue Playhouse –
Zoological Society of Milwaukee/Kohl’s Wild Theater –

http://www.milwaukeerep.com/Test-Area/Rep-Redesign-Home/Inside-The-Rep/Non-Union-Milwaukee-General-Auditions/


zie-magic-flute

ZIE MAGIC FLUTE
Music by W. A. Mozart / Libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder

English Translation by Daniel J. Brylow

 

Music, movement, and a giant snake collide in this collaboration between three of Milwaukee’s most inventive performing arts groups! Featuring performers from
Quasimondo Physical Theatre, Milwaukee Opera Theatre, and Cadance Collective.

 

Performance Dates & Times:
Friday, January 20 – 7:30 PM
Saturday, January 21 – 1:00 PM
Monday, January 23 – 7:30 PM
Wednesday, January 25 – 7:30 PM
Friday, January 27 – 7:30 PM
Saturday, January 28 – 1:00 PM
Sunday, January 29 – 1:00 PM
Tickets: $28 General / $18 Student and Artist
To order tickets, visit ziemagicflute.bpt.me or call 1-800-838-3006

 

Location: Tripoli Shrine Center, 3000 W Wisconsin Ave., Milwaukee, WI 53208

 

Stage Direction: Jill Anna Ponasik and Brian Rott        Music Direction: Paula Foley Tillen

 

Featuring:

Tamino: Benjamin Ludwig                                     Pamina: Jennifer Hansen

Queen of the Night: Sarah Richardson              Sarastro: Mark Corkins

Papageno: Nathan Wesselowski                         Papagena: Christal Wagner

First Lady: Tiana Sorenson                                  First Spirit: Jenni Reinke

Second Lady: Erin Sura                                        Second Spirit: Jessi Miller

Third Lady: Jackie Willis                                       Third Spirit: Andrew Parchman

 

For more information: www.milwaukeeoperatheatre.org

 

Contact:          Jill Anna Ponasik

Artistic Director, Milwaukee Opera Theatre

917-684-0512

www.milwaukeeoperatheatre.org


boot-camp-bunny

The Bunny Gumbo Theatre Company in association with The Waukesha Civic Theatre presents ACT Boot Camp. For the uninitiated, Combat Boot Camp challenges high school age playwrights, directors and actors to bring original scripts from initial concept to performance before a live audience … in only 2 days! Topics, locations, directors, and actors are all, literally, “pulled from a hat.” There is no advanced preparation, no warning, no mercy – just instinct, ability, and raw talent on display. Artists flying without a net!

 

Where: The Waukesha Civic Theatre, 264 W. Main Street, Waukesha, WI 53186

When: Saturday, January 7th, 2017 at 7:30 pm

Adults- $13
Students/Seniors/Military- $11
Subscriber & Group Rate- $9

For more info visit: http://waukeshacivictheatre.org/60thSeason/ACTBootCamp.html

Hop on it!boot-camp-bunny


gd
The Greendale School District is accepting applications for an Auditorium Manager. This is a full-time, year-round position. Work requires variable hours, including many nights and weekends during performances by district, community, and out-of-district groups.
This position is responsible for the oversight and technical leadership of all community events in the High School Auditorium, including district events, rentals, and performing arts events. This position works in close coordination with Theater Director, Music Department Faculty, and District staff to allocate scheduling, equipment and resources appropriately.
This position is responsible for the box office, serves as the house manager at all events, and provides comprehensive technical direction, lighting and sound design with execution of the same for all events and productions.
Qualified candidates will have strong communication skills and the ability to interact positively with students, parents, staff and the general public. A Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university in a related field such as Theater Technology or Theater
Management and a minimum of 5 years of experience in Theater Production/Management is preferred.
The Greendale School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer. We are members of a global society, and the awareness and understanding of this diversity enriches us.
A license is not required for this vacancy.
Degree: Bachelors
Experience: 3-5 Years
Salary: $40,000 – $50,000
Contact:
Human Resources
Greendale School District
6815 Southway
Greendale, WI 53129
414-423-2700