Archives for posts with tag: Milwaukee Rep

In case you have a chance to glance at this before you come in to audition today, here’s what the room looks like. As you walk in, the accompanist will be right inside the door to your left. If you are going to sing it’s best to start right there and go over your piece before you start your intro. Hope it helps.


I’ve been remiss in posting this. The Milwaukee Generals are almost upon us, so I thought now would be a good time to revisit some thoughts on auditioning. Here are my thoughts from several years ago. I’ve done a bit of judicial editing, but my thoughts on this process haven’t changed that much. Hope it helps.

 

Fletcher

 

Having sat through the Milwaukee Generals for over a decade now, I’ve come across all sorts of things that auditionees do which sabotage the work at hand. I’m continually amazed by some of these gaffs, but to be fair, how could they know? If you haven’t been in that room, and you haven’t been auditioning for years, or had some really good teachers and/or mentors, some of these gaffs might be understandable. And I understand just how hard and awful the process of auditioning is having been an actor for the last 35 years. To that end I’ve decided to share some of the dos and don’ts of auditioning. I throw in the caveat that these are strictly from my own viewpoint and that while they deal with auditioning in general, they are specific to the peculiarities of myself and the Milwaukee Generals.

 

I’m dividing this tutorial into three parts: the Introduction, the Headshot and Resume, and the Audition.

 

The Introduction 

 

If you have the chance (and that’s a big if) take a peek at the room you are going to walk into ahead of time. Auditioning is an intimidating thing and walking into a room blind is hateful. Find out where the auditors are going to be sitting and figure out where you are going to sit or stand. Find out if there is a chair available and what kind it is. Nothing worse than preparing a piece that requires you to spin a chair around and sit on it backwards only to find out that the chair has arms. For those of you new to the Milwaukee Generals, you are walking into a room to face a group of auditors in a horseshoe configuration. 

 

If you walk into the room and you find that there are auditors behind you, you’ve come in too far. Back up so that we can see your face.

 

Take your time introducing yourself and your pieces. Know that we are furiously passing your headshots around as quickly as we can, flipping them over and pouring over your resume, and then trying to catch what pieces you are going to do and in many cases trying to jot that info down. We see a lot of auditions over this long day and it’s extremely difficult to keep them straight. Give us a chance to remember you. I’ll never fault an auditionee for taking his or her time introducing their pieces. When in doubt, wait until the majority of us have finished and are looking back up at you before you begin your first piece.

 

Don’t undress in the room. This is a rather new phenomenon that has started happening lately. When you walk into the room, be prepared to go. I don’t want to see you come in, and then slowly take off a coat, scarf, shirt or any other item of clothing as you are introducing yourself. That’s odd and distracting. Leave that stuff outside.

 

This is for both your intro and exit; don’t apologize for your audition. Look, you only get one shot at this, so no matter how poorly you’ve prepared or think you’ve done during the audition, do it boldly and with a smile on your face. I can’t tell you how many people come into the room with the body language of, “Uh, hi. I don’t really know why I’m here and I’m sorry to waste your time.” Conversely, I’ve seen a lot of people who have finished a perfectly fine audition and then ruin it by sheepishly excusing themselves on the way out. Don’t do it! It sucks all of the energy out of your audition.

 

Generally speaking, goofy introductions and/or exits will fall flat and have a good chance of being irritating. I know it’s a defensive thing, but just don’t do it. Come in, smile and introduce yourself. When you are finished, say thank you. Resist the urge to ask us if we have any questions or if there’s anything else we’d like to see. Trust me; if we have any questions we won’t let you leave the room until we know the answers.

 

Give us the info we need. We need to know the character you are playing and the play it is from. That’s it. But give us both of those things. Don’t name the play but not the character, or worse yet, not tell us anything at all. This seems particularly true of Shakespeare. Don’t make it a guessing game. Conversely, don’t give us too much information. I don’t need to know the author and I certainly don’t need to be told that Hamlet was written by Shakespeare. And occasionally an auditionee will give us a summary of the piece they are about to give. Nope, don’t do it.

 

While we are on the subject of introducing your pieces, proceed to do your pieces in the order in which they were introduced. Different auditors are there for different reasons. Shakespeare companies have less interest in your modern/comic piece and are waiting for the Macbeth you are going to give them. If you say you are going to do your classical piece second, do so. They may use that brief period of time while you are performing your first piece to scan your resume and see what other classical pieces you have done and where.

 

Oftentimes the audition goes wrong during the intro. I spend a whole day with my students having them do nothing but walking into a room and introducing themselves. This is surprisingly difficult, and few people spend any time working on that part of their audition. Auditionees actually stumble over their names, forget what pieces they are doing, mispronounce the playwright’s name (which is just one more reason that info is unnecessary), mumble their info in such a way that we can’t understand it, or turn their back and drag a chair across the room while making their intro. Enter the room. If you are going to use a chair make a decision; either get the chair, pick it up and set it where you want and then introduce yourself, or introduce yourself and then get set. Trust me; we will welcome the extra time to look at your resume.

 

Unless we stand up and stick our hands out, no need to come over and shake our hands. As I’ve stated, we’re going to a whole lot of people over the course of this very long day. There are also upwards of twenty people in that room, and you won’t want to shake all of our hands.

 

The Headshot and Resume 

 

Look like your headshot. It’s bothersome when you don’t. You’re a little heavier than you’d like to be? So what? Maybe we’re looking for just that heavy person. It’s going to be very difficult to remember you later if you don’t look like your headshot.

 

Staple or glue your resume to your headshot. I can’t tell you how irritating it is to get a loose resume. Or worse yet, one in which the resume is attached in such a way that it covers your headshot. It does nothing but make you look unprofessional and your audition might fail right there before you even get in the room. And take the time to trim it to fit. I file these away and those odd sized ones just might not make it into my filing cabinet.

 

While we’re on the subject of attaching your resume, don’t attach anything else. I’m really happy you’re currently employed with your one-man show, but I don’t want a flyer or postcard attached advertising said show.

 

Leave white space on your resume. We’re doing everything we can to remember the interesting things about you in case we should want to cast you. If you jamb-pack your resume from margin to margin we have no room for such notes. It also makes them hard to read and smacks of desperation. “Look how much I’ve done!” We don’t need to know everything you’ve done and if you have stuff on there from twenty years ago you might think about some judicial editing.

 

Use a decent sized font. We’re at this all day and my eyes get tired. If you give me an 8 point font I might just give up on it after reading your name. Also, weird or funny fonts are irritating. I want to work with professionals and that might make me question that prospect. It just adds an extra hurdle where I don’t need one. And if you use comic sans I will throw your resume away.

 

There is a somewhat uniform way of setting up your resume. Feel free to diverge, but just know that doing so will increase the likelihood that I won’t be able to find the info I’m looking for quickly. At the top should be your name and under that your vitals.  Height, weight, eye color, hair color, telephone and email address. If you are a singer, you may want to put your vocal range. Do not give us your address. In this day and age, that simply isn’t safe and every now and then you send your resume to an unscrupulous person who turns around and sells that information to other places. Don’t include your age or tell us what your age range is. That’s our job and why would you want to limit yourself that way? Likewise, don’t include the dates of your productions.

 

Below your name and vitals should come the body of your resume which is your stage experience. There are four things I want to know here: the theatre you worked at, the show you did, the part you played and who directed you. Set them up in neat columns so that I can easily scan through them. Don’t be afraid to list multiple shows with one theatre, that’s a good thing; that says that you worked at that theatre and they liked you enough to ask you back. I am very leery of the auditionee that has 30 theatres listed and has only one show at each of them.

 

Below the stage experience section should be your education and special skills. Still in high school? It’s okay, we won’t hold it against you, so don’t be ashamed of it. Tell us where you went to school and who some of your teachers were, but leave your GPA off. Those names may open up a conversation. I’m not really interested if you took a weekend class here or there. Special skills should be special. I don’t know how special having a driver’s license is. Fire eating is more impressive (although one year, quite a few people had that listed) and I certainly want to know if you can speak a foreign language fluently. I assume a good actor can learn dialects, so for me that’s not something I need listed. You may have a lot of film and/or TV credits or you may have a lot of directing credits, but that’s not what we’re here for. I’m here to audition stage actors. In this day and age you should be able to have several different resumes at your disposal. If you are coming to the Milwaukee Generals, cater your resume to your clients, which are almost exclusively theatres.

 

Have enough resumes. If we don’t walk out of the room with your headshot and resume it’s unlikely we’ll ever contact you.

 

Don’t lie on your resume. It’s likely this will come to light and then you’ve lost all credibility. If you took a weekend class don’t make it sound like you received a degree. If you took a beginning improv class don’t say you are part of the troupe. If you were Gregory in Romeo and Juliet once upon a time, don’t claim that you are a trained fighter. You’re not. We know, we always know.

 

The Audition 

 

So now we come to the heart of the matter. First, know that within the first ten or fifteen seconds we have a sense if you fit into what we are looking for. Sometimes we’ve already made up our minds during the intro. That’s just the way it goes. Knowing that, limit the length of your pieces. They really should be no longer than a minute a piece. I spent one whole afternoon timing auditions. I would look down at my watch when I started to lose interest and it was always between 55 and 65 seconds. Even if you’re great, going beyond that is too much. In the past, many people were going over three minutes and that was just for one of their pieces. Leave us wanting more.

 

In picking your pieces be very selective. If you choose something offensive it is likely to offend and turn off at least a few people in the room. Have a really good reason for picking such a piece. Of course, if you are still looking for a piece right now you are probably in trouble.

 

Don’t do stand up. I’ve never seen it work and theatre is not stand up. I’ve also never seen a piece that an actor has written for themselves work.

 

Contrast your pieces. That doesn’t mean that one has to be modern comic and the other classical dramatic. You can contrast two modern funny pieces and I will be quite delighted. But standing during one and sitting during the other is not contrast. Show us two different sides of yourself and hopefully those two pieces are different than your introduction. Remember that your intro is a chance to show us a different side of yourself that will be contrasted by your two pieces. Prove that you can act.

 

Don’t do serial killer monologues. They are overdone and not usually all that interesting.

 

Don’t find a monologue in a monologue book. They generally aren’t very good and they are overused. Nothing like seeing the same bad monologue four times in the same day. Read plays, lots of them, and find something that speaks to you.

 

People bend over backwards trying to find the obscure Shakespeare piece that no one has ever seen. In doing so they generally go to some of Shakespeare’s lesser known plays. You know why they are lesser known? Because they’re not as good. You know what I’ve never seen? Someone audition with Hamlet’s “To be or not to be.”

 

Women’s monologues from Shakespeare are hard in that there are vastly fewer of them. We’re going to hear a lot of Hermia from Midsummer, Viola from Twelfth Night, and Rosalind from As You Like It. If it speaks to you and you can bring something fresh to the part, go for it! Just know that you might want to beef up your monologue book with a few other choices.

 

Don’t wear anything that is more disturbing or more interesting than you. I’ll spend the whole audition wondering, “Why did he wear that?” instead of watching your audition. Look nice, but make sure you are comfortable and can move around. And unless you live in a suit and tie 24/7, don’t wear a suit and tie. It always comes off as amateurish.

 

There is the funny monologue trap. I don’t find them very engaging for a couple of reasons. The first is that I’ve likely seen it too many times. I love Christopher Durang, but I don’t need to see a monologue from Laughing Wild ever again. The second is that I want to see you in an actual scene interacting with another or others. I want to see your struggle or your triumph, not a funny anecdote.

 

Feel free to use me as your point of focus. I will always sit in one of the corner seats for just that reason. But know that not everyone is okay with that. If you focus on one person the whole monologue, one of two things may happen: they may turn away defensively and not see your audition, or they may freeze, afraid to turn their eyes away. Me, I don’t care, I’m happy to be your focal point, however, if you stand two feet in front of me and confront me, you’re going to lose me. I’ll still stare straight at you and be the best audience member I can be, but I’m no longer really watching you. I’m beginning to wonder if you’re crazy enough to jump the table, and others in the room are starting to wonder the same thing.

 

After you are done with a piece do not say scene. Worse yet, do not wave your hand in front of your face and say scene.

 

Do make your transitions clear and clean. Do something, usually a physical move, to let us know one piece has ended and the next has begun. Of course, if they are highly contrastable pieces, that shouldn’t be a problem.

 

If you have an emotional piece and are able to go to that place, good for you. If you end that piece and take a long time coming out of it and composing yourself, showing us just how hard that was, you’re going to lose me.

 

If you get off to a bad start, ask if you can start over. We will always say yes.

 

No props. We’ll see the letter in your hand if you are invested in your scene. And never, ever, ever…NEVER! bring a gun into the room. Especially not one loaded with a half-charge blank which you then hold to your head and pull the trigger. Sigh. It now needs to be said.

 

And that’s my spiel. I’m sure other things will come to mind and I’ll update this from time to time. I also welcome observations from other auditors whether they agree with me or not. Know that during the course of my stumbling career I have made many of these mistakes myself, and it was only because some kind person took me in hand that I got past some of them.

 

Be bold and good luck.

 

Fletcher

 

P.S. The people in the room really want you to be good. We’ve got a lot on our collective minds during the course of that very long day. Please don’t read anything into our dour faces. And know that if you come in with a bright smile and a chipper attitude we will immediately light up.

 

P.P.S. Be kind to those folks out in the lobby taking your resumes.

 

P.P.S. If something happens and you can’t make your audition, call. It’s a black mark against you if you are a no show, no call. Some people who couldn’t get an audition slot may be able to slip in.


“Milwaukee Repertory Theater has an excellent opportunity for outgoing and enthusiastic Teaching Artists to join the Education Department’s faculty. We are currently looking for Teaching Artists this fall for our in-school programming! Please send cover letter and resume to careers@milwaukeerep.com.

https://www.milwaukeerep.com/RepGlobal/1819/Teaching-Artist-Job-Posting.pdf


Milwaukee Repertory Theater Searching to Cast a Young Performer in The Rep Classic The Nerd

May 8, 2019 (Milwaukee) Milwaukee Repertory Theater seeks a young performer, age 7-12, to perform the role of Thor in its upcoming production of The Nerd by Larry Shue.
From the much-loved playwright of The Foreigner comes a new production of one of the funniest plays ever written. When Willum has an unexpected party guest, who turns into an unwanted houseguest, he executes an elaborate plan to rid himself of the wacky nuisance. Aided by a rag-tag team that includes friends, a would-be lover and an oblivious boss, creative acts of desperation quickly dissolve into utter mayhem. The twists and turns of this madcap comedy lead to an ending that leaves you feeling happily hoodwinked!

THOR (7-12 years old to play an 8-year-old. Male. Black, AfroLatinx, or Latinx. Note: the actors cast to play Thor’s parents are Latinx and African American.) Thor is a temperamental, loud, boisterous, and irrepressible child. He is a hellion and a monster of a child to both his parents and strangers.
Young performers who would like to audition should have their parents fill out the electronic submission form via Google Forms (link below) to request an appointment. Access to a computer with a strong internet connection is recommended, but if you do not have access to a computer/internet, please feel free to call Artistic Administrator, Dylan Sladky, who will assist with the application by phone. Dylan can be reached at (414) 290-5391.

Please submit material no later than Friday, May 10 by clicking the following link and filling out the Google Form: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1LlCW0zhUGwig9ebJ2IAQkMgLWnGEvUzVXiwZ9Vx6tw0 Individual appointments will be assigned to candidates we would like to invite to come for an audition. No one will be seen without an appointment.
The Nerd rehearses Tuesday through Sunday, October 15 through November 14 and performs November 15 through December 15. Young performers will be required to miss school during tech week and for matinee performances. Please include all conflicts for these dates in the Google Form application or be prepared to list all conflicts when submitting directly to Dylan Sladky.

For additional questions, please contact Frank Honts, Casting Director, at fhonts@milwaukeerep.com or via phone at (414) 290-5374.

About Milwaukee Repertory Theater Milwaukee Rep is the largest performing arts organization in Wisconsin in terms of audiences served and one of the largest professional theaters in the country. Each year, The Rep welcomes up to 275,000 people at nearly 700 performances of 15 productions ranging from compelling dramas, powerful

classics, new plays and full-scale musicals in its three unique performance venues – the Quadracci Powerhouse, Stiemke Studio and Stackner Cabaret. Now in its 65th Season, The Rep has gained a national reputation as an incubator of new work, an agent of community change and a forward-thinking provider of vital arts education programs. Under the leadership of Artistic Director Mark Clements and Executive Director Chad Bauman, Milwaukee Repertory Theater ignites positive change in the cultural, social, and economic vitality of its community by creating world-class theater experiences that entertain, provoke, and inspire meaningful dialogue among an audience representative of Milwaukee’s rich diversity.


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The 2018 Non-Equity Milwaukee General Auditions will take place on Monday, January 8, 2018, from 8:45am to 6:00pm, at Milwaukee Repertory Theater.  This is a locals only audition – only adult-aged, Milwaukee-based, non-union professional actors who do not require assistance with travel and housing should attend.

THE SIGN-UP PROCESS

We will again implement the lottery system used last year, due to the continued high demand for these audition slots:

• The lottery will be conducted for this year’s audition and waiting list slots.   There will still be an in-person component to this process, in order to maintain focus on local talent.

• Actors who auditioned in the 2017 Milwaukee General Auditions will not be allowed to do so in 2018.  Actors who auditioned in 2016 will be eligible to do so again in 2018.

• Actors enrolled in college or university and in their final semester of study before graduation at the time of the auditions will be eligible to attend.  All other student actors must wait until they meet this requirement.

• Actors born after January 8, 2000 are not eligible to audition.

On Saturday December 16, 2017 at 9:30am, interested actors will be able submit their respective Non-Equity Milwaukee General Auditions Lottery Entry Forms outside of Milwaukee Repertory Theater’s  Stackner Cabaret – https://www.milwaukeerep.com/Plan-Your-Visit/Directions–Parking/ – on the 2nd floor atrium of the Patty & Jay Baker Theater Complex, accessible via elevator or via the escalator near building security.

Lottery forms are available for download here in advance of these auditions, so that interested actors may download, print, and complete them in advance of the lottery day.  Paper copies of the form will not be made available on the day of the lottery.  Lottery Entry Forms must be downloaded, printed, and completed in advance.  Interested actors must also present a valid form of photo identification (driver’s license or state-issued identification is recommended) in order to submit her/his lottery entry.  In addition, please note that an individual is eligible to submit one Lottery Entry only, and only for oneself – entries made for other individuals will not be accepted.

Here are the specifics of the sign-up process that will take place on December 16, 2017:

•From 8:30am to 9:30am, Lottery Entry Forms will be validated and accepted.

•At 9:30am, the Lottery will take place.  Participating actors must be present to accept a slot resulting from a winning Lottery Entry.  If your name is called and you are not present, your winning entry will be forfeited.

•As winning Lottery Entries are drawn, that actor will have the opportunity to sign up for a remaining available Audition or Waiting List slot.  Winning entries will be processed in the order in which they are drawn.

There will be 10 Waiting List slots available.  Sign-up for these slots will occur in the same manner as outlined above once all auditions slot have been filled.  Obtaining a Waiting List slot does not guarantee an audition, but preference for any slots that open (due to cancellation, for example, at a later date) will be given to those actors on the Waiting List.


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Non-Union Milwaukee General Audtions

The 2017 Non-Union Milwaukee General Auditions will take place on Monday, January 30th, 2017, from 8:45am to 5:00pm, at Milwaukee Repertory Theater.  This is a locals only audition – only adult-aged, Milwaukee-based, non-union professional actors who do not require assistance with travel and housing should attend.

THE SIGN-UP PROCESS
We will again implement the lottery system used last year, due to the continued high demand for these audition slots:

  • The lottery will be conducted for this year’s audition and waiting list slots.   There will still be an in-person component to this process, in order to maintain focus on local talent.
  • Actors who auditioned in the 2016 Milwaukee General Auditions will not be allowed to do so in 2017.  At this time, we anticipate that actors who auditioned in 2016 will be eligible to do so again in 2018.
  • Actors enrolled in college or university and in their final semester of study before graduation at the time of the auditions will be eligible to attend.  All other student actors must wait until they meet this requirement.
  • Actors born after January 30th, 1999 are not eligible to audition.

On Saturday January 7th, 2017 at 9:30a, interested actors will be able submit their respective Non-Union Milwaukee General Auditions Lottery Entry Forms outside of Milwaukee Repertory Theater’s Stackner Cabaret on the 2nd floor Arboretum of the Patty & Jay Baker Theater Complex, accessible via elevator or via the escalator near building security.

Lottery forms are available for download here in advance of these auditions, so that interested actors may download, print, and complete them in advance of the lottery day.  Paper copies of the form will not be made available on the day of the lottery.  Lottery Entry Forms must be downloaded, printed, and completed in advance.  Interested actors must also present a valid form of photo identification (driver’s license or state-issued identification is recommended) in order to submit her/his lottery entry.  In addition, please note that an individual is eligible to submit one Lottery Entry only, and only for oneself – entries made for other individuals will not be accepted.

Here are the specifics of the sign-up process that will take place on January 7th, 2017:

  •  From 8:30a to 9:30a, Lottery Entry Forms will be validated and accepted.
  •  At 9:30a, the Lottery will take place.  Participating actors must be present to accept a slot resulting from a winning Lottery Entry.  If your name is called and you are not present, your winning entry will be forfeit.
  • As winning Lottery Entries are drawn, that actor will have the opportunity to sign up for a remaining available Audition or Waiting List slot.  Winning entries will be processed in the order in which they are drawn.

There will also be 10 Waiting List slots available.  Sign-up for these slots will occur in the same manner as outlined above, once all auditions slot have been filled.  Obtaining a Waiting List slot does not guarantee an audition, but preference for any slots that open (due to cancellation, for example) at a later date will be given to those actors on the Waiting List.

PREPARING FOR THE AUDITIONS
Audition slots will be 4 minutes long, and will consist of any two of the following:

  • One contemporary monologue
  • One classical monologue (preferably Shakespeare)
  • One musical theater selection – 60 to 90 seconds in duration.  An accompanist will be in attendance.

Please note that the actor’s introduction and any time necessary to communicate with the accompanist will count as part of the 4 minutes.  Please prepare and time your selections carefully, as actors who exceed the audition time of 4 minutes will be stopped.

Non-Equity actors should plan to bring 30 headshots/resumes and should be neatly staples back-to-back prior to the audition date. Actors who choose to audition with a musical theater selection and desire accompaniment should come prepared with sheet music.

Questions?  Please email Dylan K. Sladky, Artistic Administrator, at dsladky@milwaukeerep.com.  Due to the volume of questions, please allow two business days for a response.

All interested actors should visit this page regularly for information and updates. 

COMPANIES INTERESTED IN ATTENDING
(updated December 7
th, 2016)

The Alchemist Theatre –
The Bunny Gumbo Theater Company –
Milwaukee Chamber Theatre –
American Player’s Theatre –
Next Act –
Milwaukee Repertory Theater –
Milwaukee Comedy –
All In Productions –
Actor’s Craft Seventh Avenue Theatre –
Theatre RED –
Third Avenue Playhouse –
Cooperative Performance Milwaukee –
First Stage Children’s Theatre –
Fireside Theatre –
Bronzeville Arts Ensemble –
Theatre LILA –
Quasimondo Milwaukee Physical Theatre –
Children’s Theater of Madison –
Forward Theater Company –
In Tandem Theatre –
Lori Lins Talent –
Renaissance Theaterworks –
Solstice Theatre –
The Third Avenue Playhouse –
Zoological Society of Milwaukee/Kohl’s Wild Theater –

http://www.milwaukeerep.com/Test-Area/Rep-Redesign-Home/Inside-The-Rep/Non-Union-Milwaukee-General-Auditions/


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Position:              Marketing Coordinator

Department:      Marketing

Reports to:          Director of Marketing

Status:                  Part Time, Seasonal, Non-Exempt

 

Basic Function:
Milwaukee Repertory Theater seeks an outgoing, organized, motivated and detail-oriented individual to assist with the company’s Audience Development Events and Marketing Efforts.

 

Duties and Responsibilities:
The Marketing Coordinator will be responsible for managing the details and logistics of Audience Development Events including Out-n-About Nights, Professionals Nights as well as The Rep’s participation/presence at local festivals and fairs. The Coordinator will work with other marketing staff to connect plays with relevant communities and organizations in the Greater Milwaukee area. This position will explore and develop collaborative partnerships with other organizations as a means of increasing ticket sales and visibility. The position will also support the Marketing Department with other duties including print materials distribution, direct mail assistance and a variety of administrative tasks.

 

Qualifications:
The ideal candidate will have excellent interpersonal and communication skills, be detail-oriented, and comfortable in a position that is hands-on with a high volume of diverse activities. The candidate should be proficient in Microsoft Office Suite, a working knowledge of Mac OS and/or Adobe Creative Suite a plus. Arts background desired.  Some nights and weekends required. Applicant must have a car for travel and transporting materials to events.  Candidate should also be able to lift and carry heavy objects up to 50 pounds, with or without reasonable accommodation.

 

To Apply:

The deadline to apply is Friday, July 8. Milwaukee Repertory Theater is interested in receiving applications from a broad spectrum of people, including women and minorities.  This is a 28 hours per week part-time, seasonal position.  Interested candidates should send cover letter and resume to Director of Marketing Cara McMullin at cmcmullin@milwaukeerep.com.  No phone calls please. Milwaukee Rep is an equal opportunity employer. For more information, visit www.MilwaukeeRep.com.


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ACTING FOR THE CAMERA

  • Start Date: Monday, Sep-14-2015
  • Location: RP Classroom

This fast-paced class will not only introduce students to the fundamentals of acting onscreen, but help students get started in a time when everyone has the power to create and share their film work. Topics to be explored and developed may include script and character analysis, basic acting techniques, networking, auditioning, and talent expectations for social media, micro-budget, and professional film projects. Whether you are a filmmaker as a hobby or eager amateur that wishes to turn professional, this course will help direct your passion to the best jumping off point.

Instructor: Sam Kozel

Class fee: $175

Prerequisite: None

Mondays 5:30-7:30 pm September 14, 21, 28, October 5, 12, 19

Starting in the filmmaking industry as an Actor, Sam Kozel now has over 11 years experience spanning over 100 films, working in various capacities, 10 of which have appeared in the Milwaukee Film Festival. Most notably Executive Producing the feature “Serial Daters Anonymous” starring Sam Page (Mad Men).

Sam is currently focusing on expanding his non-profit movie studio Film Freed as well as Screenwriting and Directing after earning an 8/10 on the Blacklist and is currently working on an original script with a Hollywood producer.


Rep 8

EDUCATION COORDINATOR
Department: Education
Supervisor: Education Director
Classification: Full Time, Annual, Non-Exempt

Basic Function:
Milwaukee Repertory Theater seeks a highly organized, detail-oriented, self-motivated individual to join the Education Department of one of the nation’s most exciting and highly regarded theater companies.

Duties and Responsibilities:
The Education Coordinator will be responsible for administrative duties for all education programs, teaching residency programs, marketing education programs, research and writing study guides, coordinating program assessments, and communication and program booking for other education programs, including workshops, career days and backstage tours. The position will manage the Adult Training Program, including teaching classes. This person will also oversee the Rep Education Internships.

Qualifications:
The ideal candidate will possess the following skills:
• Strong administrative skills, including precise attention to detail and the ability to effectively balance numerous short- and long-term tasks simultaneously
• Excellent verbal and written communication skills
• Solid research and writing ability
• Strong computer skills, including proficiency in Microsoft Office Suite (Outlook, Excel, Word), and experience with Filemaker Pro and Tessitura is a plus
• A car is necessary for travel to schools
• Some flexibility in weekly hours is necessary. Start date will be early October, 2015.

To Apply:
We are interested in receiving applications from a broad spectrum of people, including women and minorities. This is a full-time, annual, early career salaried position with excellent health benefits. Send cover letter, resume, references, and a recent writing sample to Jenny Toutant, Education Director, Milwaukee Repertory Theater, 108 E. Wells Street, Milwaukee, WI, 53202 or jtoutant@milwaukeerep.com. Applications accepted until Monday, August 31.