Archives for posts with tag: The Rep

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The Milwaukee Generals are almost upon us, so I thought now would be a good time to revisit some thoughts on auditioning.  Here are my thoughts from a couple of years ago.  I’ve done a bit of judicial editing, but my thoughts on this process haven’t changed that much.  Hope it helps.

 

Fletcher

 

Having sat through the Milwaukee Generals for the last several years, I’ve come across all sorts of things that auditionees do which sabotage the work at hand.  I’m continually amazed by some of these gaffs, but to be fair, how could they know?  I understand just how hard and awful the process of auditioning is having been an actor for the last 35 years.  To that end I’ve decided to share some of the dos and don’ts of auditioning.  I throw in the caveat that these are strictly from my own viewpoint and that while they deal with auditioning in general, they are specific to the peculiarities of myself and the Milwaukee Generals.

 

I’m dividing this “tutorial” into three parts: the Introduction, the Headshot and Resume and the Audition.

 

The Introduction 

 

If you have the chance (and that’s a big if) take a peek at the room you are going to walk into ahead of time.  Auditioning is an intimidating thing and walking into a room blind is hateful.  Find out where the auditors are going to be sitting and figure out where you are going to sit or stand.  Find out if there is a chair available and what kind it is.  Nothing worse than preparing a piece that requires you to spin a chair around and sit on it backwards only to find out that the chair has arms.  For those of you new to the Milwaukee Generals, you are walking into a room to face a group of auditors in a horseshoe configuration. 

 

If you walk into the room and you find that there are auditors behind you, you’ve come in too far.  Back up so that we can see your face.

 

Take your time introducing yourself and your pieces.  Know that we are furiously passing your headshots around as quickly as we can, flipping them over and pouring over your resume and then trying to catch what pieces you are going to do and in many cases trying to jot that info down.  We see a lot of auditions over those couple of days and it’s extremely difficult to keep them straight.  Give us a chance to remember you.  I’ll never fault an auditionee for taking his or her time introducing their pieces.  When in doubt, wait until the majority of us have finished and are looking back up at you before you begin your first piece.

 

Don’t undress in the room.  This is a rather new phenomenon that has started happening lately.  When you walk into the room, be prepared to go.  I don’t want to see you come in, and then slowly take off a coat, scarf, shirt or any other item of clothing as you are introducing yourself.  That’s weird and distracting.  Leave that stuff outside.

 

This is for both your intro and exit; don’t apologize for your audition.  Look, you only get one shot at this, so no matter how poorly you’ve prepared or think you’ve done during the audition, do it boldly and with a smile on your face.  I can’t tell you how many people come into the room with the body language of, “Uh, hi.  I don’t really know why I’m here and I’m sorry to waste your time.”  Conversely I’ve seen a lot of people who have finished a perfectly fine audition and then ruin it by sheepishly excusing themselves on the way out.  Don’t do it!  It sucks all of the energy out of your audition.

 

Generally speaking, goofy introductions and/or exits will fall flat and have a good chance of being irritating.  I know it’s a defensive thing, but just don’t do it.  Come in, smile and introduce yourself.  When you are finished, say thank you.  Resist the urge to ask us if we have any questions or if there’s anything else we’d like to see.  Trust me; if we have those questions we won’t let you leave the room until we know the answers.

 

Give us the info we need.  It has become fashionable of late to name the play your audition is from, but not the part; or worse yet, not tell us anything at all.  This seems particularly true of Shakespeare.  Don’t make it a guessing game.  Conversely, don’t give us too much information.  In most cases I don’t need to know the author and I certainly don’t need to be told that Hamlet was written by Shakespeare.  And occasionally an auditionee will give us a summary of the piece they are about to give.  Nope, don’t do it.

 

While we are on the subject of introducing your pieces, proceed to do your pieces in the order in which they were introduced.  Different auditors are there for different reasons.  Shakespeare companies have less interest in your modern/comic piece and are waiting for the Macbeth you are going to do.  If you say you are going to do your classical piece second, do so.  They may use that brief period of time while you are performing your first piece to scan your resume and see what other classical pieces you have done and where.

 

Oftentimes the audition goes wrong during the intro.  I spend a whole day with my students having them do nothing but walking into a room and introducing themselves.  This is surprisingly difficult, and few people spend any time on that part of their audition.  Auditionees actually stumble over their names, forget what pieces they are doing, mispronounce the playwright’s name (which is just one more reason that info is unnecessary), mumble their info in such a way that we can’t understand it or turn their back and drag a chair across the room while making their intro.  Enter the room.  If you are going to use a chair make a decision; either get the chair, pick it up and set it where you want and then introduce yourself, or introduce yourself and then get set.  Trust me; we will welcome the extra time to look at your resume.

 

Unless we stand up and stick our hands out, no need to come over and shake our hands.  As I’ve stated, we’re going to a whole lot of people over the course of this very long day.  There are also upwards of twenty people in that room and you won’t want to shake all of our hands.

 

The Headshot and Resume 

 

Look like your headshot.  It’s bothersome when you don’t.  You’re a little heavier than you’d like to be?  So what.  Maybe we’re looking for just that heavy person.  It’s going to be very difficult to remember you later if you don’t look like your headshot.

 

Staple or glue your resume to your headshot.  I can’t tell you how irritating it is to get a loose resume.  Or worse yet, one in which the resume is paper-clipped to the headshot actually covering the headshot.  It does nothing but make you look unprofessional and your audition might fail right there before you even get in the room.  And take the time to trim it to fit.  I file these away and those odd sized ones just might not make it into my filing cabinet.

 

While we’re on the subject of attaching your resume, don’t attach anything else.  I’m really happy you’re currently employed with your one-man show, but I don’t want a flyer or postcard attached advertising said show.

 

Leave white space on your resume.  We’re doing everything we can to remember the interesting things about you in case we should want to cast you.  If you jamb-pack your resume from margin to margin we have no room for such notes.  It also makes them hard to read and smacks of desperation.  “Look how much I’ve done!”  We don’t need to know everything you’ve done and if you have stuff on there from twenty years ago you might think about some judicial editing.

 

Use a decent sized font.  We’re at this all day and my eyes get tired.  If you give me an 8 point font I’ll want to throw your resume in the discard pile then and there.  Also, weird or funny fonts are irritating.  It just adds an extra hurdle where I don’t need one.  And if you use comic sans I will throw your resume away.

 

There is a somewhat uniform way of setting up your resume.  Feel free to diverge, but just know that doing so will increase the likelihood that I won’t be able to find the info I’m looking for.  At the top should be your name and under that your vitals.  Height, weight, eye color, hair color, telephone and email address.  If you are a singer you may want to put your vocal range.  Do not give us your address.  In this day and age that simply isn’t safe and every now and then you send your resume to an unscrupulous person who turns around and sells your resume to other places.  Don’t include your age or tell us what your age range is.  That’s our job and why would you want to limit yourself that way?  Likewise, don’t include the dates of your productions.

 

Below your name and vitals should come the body of your resume which is your stage experience.  There are four things I want to know here: the theatre you worked at, the show you did, the part you played and who directed you.  Set them up in neat columns so that I can easily scan through them.  Don’t be afraid to list multiple shows with one theatre, that’s a good thing; that says that you worked at that theatre and they liked you enough to ask you back.  I am very leery of the auditionee that has 30 theatres listed and has only one show at each of them.

 

Below the stage experience section should be your education and special skills.  Still in high school?  It’s okay, we won’t hold it against you, so don’t be ashamed of it.  Tell us where you went to school and who some of your teachers were, but leave your GPA off.  Those names may open up a conversation.  I’m not really interested if you took a weekend class here or there.  Special skills should be special.  I don’t know how special having a driver’s license is.  Fire eating is more impressive (although at this last audition every other person had that listed) and I certainly want to know if you can speak a foreign language fluently.  I assume a good actor can learn dialects, so for me I don’t really care.

You may have a lot of film and/or TV credits; you may have a lot of directing credits.  I don’t care.  I’m here to audition stage actors.  In this day and age you should be able to have several different resumes at your disposal.  If you are coming to the Milwaukee Generals, cater your resume to your clients, which are almost exclusively theatres.

 

Have enough resumes.  We don’t like sharing.

 

Don’t lie on your resume.  You will be busted and then you’ve lost all credibility.  If you took a weekend class don’t make it sound like you received a degree.  If you took a beginning improv class don’t say you are part of the troope.  If you were Gregory in Romeo and Juliet once upon a time, don’t claim that you are a trained fighter.  You’re not.  We know, we always know.

 

The Audition 

 

So now we come to the heart of the matter.  First know that within the first ten or fifteen seconds we know if we like you or not.  Sometimes we’ve already made up our minds during the intro.  That’s just the way it goes.  Knowing that, limit the length of your pieces.  They really should be no longer than a minute a piece.  I spent one whole afternoon timing auditions.  I would look down at my watch when I started to lose interest and it was always between 55 and 65 seconds.  Even if you’re great, going beyond that is too much.  In the past, many people were going over three minutes and that was just for one of their pieces.  Leave us wanting more.

 

In picking your pieces be very selective.  If you choose something offensive it is likely to offend and turn off at least a few people in the room.  Have a really good reason for picking such a piece. Of course if you are still looking for a piece right now you are probably in trouble.

 

Don’t do stand up.  I’ve never seen it work and theatre is not stand up.  I’ve also never seen a piece that an actor has written for themselves work.

 

Contrast your pieces.  That doesn’t mean that one has to be modern comic and the other classical dramatic.  You can contrast two modern funny pieces and I will be quite delighted.  But standing during one and sitting during the other is not contrast.  Show us two different sides of yourself and hopefully those two pieces are different than your introduction.  Remember that your intro is a chance to show us a different side of yourself that will be contrasted by your two pieces.  Prove that you can act.

 

Don’t do serial killer monologues.  They are overdone and not usually all that interesting.

 

Don’t find a monologue in a monologue book.  They generally aren’t very good and they are overused.  Nothing like seeing the same bad monologue four times in the same day.  Read plays, lots of them, and find something that speaks to you.

 

People bend over backwards trying to find the obscure Shakespeare piece that no one has ever seen.  In doing so they generally go to some of Shakespeare’s lesser known plays.  You know why they are lesser known?  Because they’re not as good.  You know what I’ve never seen?  Someone audition with “To be or not to be.”

 

Don’t wear anything that is more disturbing or more interesting than you.  I’ll spend the whole audition wondering, “Why did he wear that?” instead of watching your audition.  Look nice, but make sure you are comfortable and can move around.  And unless you live in a suit and tie 24/7, don’t wear a suit and tie.  It always comes off as amateurish.

 

Your pieces should actually be scenes in which you are engaged in some kind of action as opposed to telling us a funny story.  I want to see your struggle, not your charming me with a funny anecdote.

 

Feel free to use me as your point of focus.  I will always sit in one of the corner seats for just that reason.  But know that not everyone is okay with that.  However, if you stand two feet in front of me and confront me, you’re going to lose me.  I’ll still stare straight at you and be the best audience member I can be, but I’m no longer really watching you.  I’m beginning to wonder if you’re crazy enough to jump the table and others in the room are concentrating on the same thing.

 

After you are done with a piece do not say scene.  Worse yet, do not wave your hand in front of your face and say scene.

 

Do make your transitions clear and clean.  Do something, usually a physical move, to let us know one piece has ended and the next has begun.  Of course if they are highly contrastable pieces, that shouldn’t be a problem.

 

If you have an emotional piece and are able to go to that place, good for you.  If you end that piece and take a long time coming out of it and composing yourself, showing us just how hard that was, I will no longer love you.

 

If you get off to a bad start ask if you can start over.  We will always say yes.

 

No props.  We’ll see the letter in your hand if you are invested in your scene.  And never, ever, ever…NEVER! bring a gun into the room.  Especially not one loaded with a half-charge blank which you then hold to your head and pull the trigger.  Sigh.  It now needs to be said.

 

And that’s my spiel.  I’m sure other things will come to mind and I’ll update this from time to time.  I also welcome observations from other auditors whether they agree with me or not.  Know that during the course of my stumbling career I have made many of these mistakes myself, and it was only because some kind person took me in hand that I got past some of them.  I’m still an awful auditionee.

 

Be bold and good luck.

 

Fletcher

 

P.S. The people in the room really want you to be good.  We’ve got a lot on our collective minds during the course of that very long day.  Please don’t read anything into our dour faces.  And know that if you come in with a bright smile and a chipper attitude we will immediately light up.

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EducationSecondary

Don’t forget to treat yourself while holiday shopping! Sign up for Adult Acting Classes with Milwaukee Repertory Theater!

Acting for the Camera II Begins January 7th! Sign up here: https://www.milwaukeerep.com/courses/courseregister.aspx?CourseId=41898

Basic Acting I Begins March 18nd! Sign up here: https://www.milwaukeerep.com/courses/courseregister.aspx?CourseId=42593

Please contact Auburn Matson, Education Administrator with any questions. You can reach her at amatson@milwaukeerep.com


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The 2019 Non-Equity Milwaukee General Auditions will take place on Monday, January 21st, 2019, from 8:45am to 6:00pm, at Milwaukee Repertory Theater.  This is a locals only audition – only adult-aged, Milwaukee-based, non-union professional actors who do not require assistance with travel and housing should attend.

THE SIGN-UP PROCESS

Due to the continued high demand for these audition slots, we will again implement the lottery system used last year:

  • The lottery will be conducted for this year’s audition and waiting list slots.   There is an in-person component to this process in order to maintain focus on local talent.
  • Actors who auditioned in the 2018 Milwaukee General Auditions will not be allowed to do so in 2019. Actors who auditioned in 2017 are eligible to do so again in 2019.
  • Actors enrolled in college or university and in their final semester of study before graduation at the time of the auditions will be eligible to attend.  All other student actors must wait until they meet this requirement.
  • Actors born after January 21st, 2001 are not eligible to audition.

On Saturday December 15th, 2018, interested actors will be able submit their respective Non-Equity Milwaukee General Auditions Lottery Entry Forms outside of Milwaukee Repertory Theater’s  Stackner Cabaret https://www.milwaukeerep.com/Plan-Your-Visit/Directions–Parking/ on the 2nd floor atrium of the Patty & Jay Baker Theater Complex, accessible via elevator or via the escalator near building security.

Lottery forms are available for download here in advance of these auditions so that interested actors may download, print, and complete them in advance of the lottery day.  Paper copies of the form will not be made available on the day of the lottery.  Lottery Entry Forms must be downloaded, printed, and completed in advance.  Interested actors must also present a valid form of photo identification (driver’s license or state-issued identification is recommended) in order to submit their lottery entry.  In addition, please note that an individual is eligible to submit one Lottery Entry only, and only for oneself-entries made for other individuals will not be accepted.

 

 

 

Here are the specifics of the sign-up process that will take place on December 15th, 2018:

  • From 8:30a to 9:30a, Lottery Entry Forms will be validated and accepted.
  • At 9:30a, the Lottery will take place. Participating actors must be present to accept a slot resulting from a Lottery Entry.  If your name is called and you are not present, your entry will be forfeited.
  • As Lottery Entries are drawn, that actor will have the opportunity to sign up for a remaining available Audition or Waiting List slot. Entries will be processed in the order in which they are drawn.

There will be 10 Waiting List slots available.  Sign-up for these slots will occur in the same manner as outlined above once all auditions slot have been filled.  Obtaining a Waiting List slot does not guarantee an audition, but preference for any slots that open (due to cancellation, for example, at a later date) will be given to those actors on the Waiting List. As we have streamlined this process over the last few years, we now recommend any interested actors on the Wait List come to the auditions in the very likely case we are running ahead of schedule and are able to offer a slot in the moment. Please note that this is not a guarantee of being seen.

PREPARING FOR THE AUDITIONS

Audition slots will be 4 minutes long, and will consist of any two of the following:

  • One contemporary monologue
  • One classical monologue (preferably Shakespeare)
  • One musical theater selection – 60 to 90 seconds in duration. An accompanist will be in attendance.

Please note that the actor’s introduction and any time necessary to communicate with the accompanist will count as part of the 4 minutes.  Please prepare and time your selections carefully, as actors who exceed the audition time of 4 minutes will be stopped.

Actors should plan to bring 35 headshots/resumes that must be neatly stapled back to back prior to the audition date. (Please no paperclips or loose paper.) Actors who choose to audition with a musical theater selection and desire accompaniment should come prepared with sheet music arranged in a way that will be easy for our accompanist to read.

All actors must check in 30 minutes prior to their scheduled audition times. This will allow the auditions to move forward with fewer interruptions.

Questions?  Please email Dylan K. Sladky, Artistic Administrator, at dsladky@milwaukeerep.com.  Due to the volume of questions, please allow two business days for a response.

All interested actors should visit this page regularly for information and updates.

2019 Non-Union Milwaukee General Auditions

Lottery Entry Form

Name:                                                                                                                                                                                                 

Address:                                                                                                                                                                                             

                                                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                                                               

Phone number:                                                                                                               

Phone type:                       O Mobile            O Home              O Work                (Check one)

Email Address:                                                                                                                                                                                 

By submitting this lottery form for the 2019 Milwaukee General Auditions, I hereby acknowledge the following:

  • I understand that submission of this form does not guarantee an audition slot or a waiting list slot in the 2019 Milwaukee General Auditions.
  • I was born before January 21st, 2001.
  • I will not be enrolled in college or university as of June 2019.
  • I am a resident of the Greater Milwaukee area.
  • I did not audition in the 2018 Milwaukee General Auditions.
  • I am not a member of Actors’ Equity Association.

Signature:                                                                                                                                                                          

Date:                                                                                                    

 

 

The 17th Annual

Milwaukee General Auditions

January 21st, 2019

 

 

 


fb-repRegistration is open f

or fall classes at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater! We still have a few spots available, and some start as soon as September 10th!
Our classes include
• a two part Acting for the Camera series, focusing on acting technique, auditioning, networking in today’s industry (register for part 1 here, and part 2 here!)
Stage Combat, which focuses on unarmed combat with an opportunity to test for Level 1 certification with Duel Arts International (register here)
• a three part Basic Acting series, which explores fundamentals of acting including monologues, character development and scenework (Register for part 1 here, part 2 here, and part three is coming in the spring!)

Additional information can be found at https://www.milwaukeerep.com/Engage–Learn/Business–Adult-Training/Adult-Classes/

Questions can be directed to Auburn Matson, Education Administrator at amatson@milwaukeerep.com

 

Come join Acting for the Camera II! Class starts Monday, September 10th, but we still do have spots available! If have previously taken Acting for the Camera I or have previous on-camera acting experience and are ready to learn more, this class is perfect for you!

ACTING FOR THE CAMERA II

Acting for the Camera II focuses on developing more deeply the key technical skills introduced in Acting for the Camera I. Through individually tailored, real-world material, the instructor will lead you through commercial, theatrical, slate, interview, and monologue work. The class will devote time each week to honing on-camera practice and critique in the five major areas listed above. The goal of this class is to give each student a stronger sense of developed skill, confidence, industry preparedness, and a slew of marketable reel material. Please contact Auburn Matson with a brief summary of your qualifications if you have any questions about your eligibility for this course.

 

Instructor: Thomas Adisi
Class Fee: $200
Prerequisite: Acting for the Camera I
Next session: September 10, 17, 24, October 1, 8, 15 from 5:30–7:30pm.

 

Follow this link to register online: https://www.milwaukeerep.com/courses/courseregister.aspx?CourseId=41898


fight

Stage Combat: Dueling Arts International

Some of the greatest climactic moments in theater are centered on violence.  In order to safely perform these moments, actors must train under a fight director.  These series of classes focus on teaching techniques for creating the illusion of violence in a theatrical setting.  They emphasize physical awareness, dynamic acting choices, fitness, and partnering.  There will be the opportunity to test for Level 1 Certification for the class weapon through Dueling Arts International.

Rapier and Dagger – In the early 16th century as the popularity of dueling increased and the efficiency of large heavy armors decreased, an off handed weapon began to be employed for defense; the dagger being the most popular for its ease of carry and offensive capabilities.  Combatants will be challenged to integrate both sides of their bodies in dynamic choreography where they will be able to attack and defend at the same time. Weapons will be provided.

If interested in registering for this course, please click here.
Instructor: JJ Gatesman
Fee: $250

No Prerequisite               

Monday, July 23rd             5:30 – 7:30 PM
Wednesday, July 25th      5:30 – 7:30 PM
Monday, July 30th             5:30 – 7:30 PM
Wednesday, Aug. 1st       5:30 – 7:30 PM
Tuesday, Aug. 7th             5:30 – 7:30 PM*
Wednesday, Aug. 8th       5:30 – 7:30 PM
Monday, Aug. 13th            5:30 – 7:30 PM
Wednesday, Aug. 15th    5:30 – 7:30 PM
*Please note class will be held on Tuesday, August 7th due to instructor availability.


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We are thrilled to offer upcoming Adult Acting classes this summer at The Milwaukee Rep! Please visit our website to register: https://www.milwaukeerep.com/Engage–Learn/Business–Adult-Training/Adult-Classes/


BASIC ACTING I: INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE

This intro class is designed for non-professionals from all occupations interested in developing essential skills (such as confidence, focus, creative and critical thinking, etc.) while sharpening their basic acting skills. Classes will encourage students to use their imagination, body, and voice to explore specific techniques used to enhance any stage performance. Special attention is given to preparing a contemporary monologue. Participants of the entire Basic Acting series (I, II and III) will receive a signed Certificate of Participation at the end of Basic Acting III.

Instructor: Joshua Krause
Class fee: $150
Prerequisite: None
Next session: July 16, 23, 30, August 6, 13, 20 from 5:30-7:00pm

ACTING FOR THE CAMERA I

This fast-paced class will not only introduce students to the fundamentals of acting onscreen, but also help students get started in a time when everyone has the power to create and share their film work. Topics explored and developed may include script and character analysis, basic acting techniques, networking, auditioning, and talent expectations for social media, micro-budget, and professional film projects. Whether you are a filmmaker as a hobby or an eager amateur that wishes to turn professional, this course will help direct your passion to the best starting point.

Instructor: Thomas Adisi
Class fee: $175
Prerequisite: None
Next session: Wednesdays: July 18, 25, August 8, 15, 22 from 5:30–7:30pm

STAGE COMBAT: DUELING ARTS INTERNATIONAL

Some of the greatest climactic moments in theater are centered on violence.  In order to safely perform these moments, actors must train under a fight director.  These series of classes focus on teaching techniques for creating the illusion of violence in a theatrical setting.  They emphasize physical awareness, dynamic acting choices, fitness, and partnering.  There will be the opportunity to test for Level 1 Certification for the class weapon through Dueling Arts International.

Rapier and Dagger – In the early 16th century as the popularity of dueling increased and the efficiency of large heavy armors decreased, an off handed weapon began to be employed for defense; the dagger being the most popular for its ease of carry and offensive capabilities.  Combatants will be challenged to integrate both sides of their bodies in dynamic choreography where they will be able to attack and defend at the same time. Weapons will be provided.

 

Instructor: JJ Gatesman
Class Fee: $250
Prerequisite: None
Next session: Mondays & Wednesdays: July 23, 25, 30, August 1, *Tuesday, August 7*, 8, 13, and 15 from 5:30-7:30 pm.
Note: Please note class will be held on Tuesday, August 7th due to instructor availability.

 

ACTING FOR THE CAMERA II

Acting for the Camera II focuses on developing more deeply the key technical skills introduced in Acting for the Camera I. Through individually tailored, real-world material, the instructor will lead you through commercial, theatrical, slate, interview, and monologue work. The class will devote time each week to honing on-camera practice and critique in the five major areas listed above. The goal of this class is to give each student a stronger sense of developed skill, confidence, industry preparedness, and a slew of marketable reel material. Please contact Auburn Matson with a brief summary of your qualifications if you have any questions about your eligibility for this course.

 

Instructor: Thomas Adisi
Class Fee: $200
Prerequisite: Acting for the Camera I
Next session: Mondays: September 10, 17, 24, October 1, 8, 15 from 5:30 – 7:30 pm.

 

 

AUBURN MATSON | Education Administrator | Milwaukee Repertory Theater
Patty & Jay Baker Theater Complex | 108 East Wells Street | Milwaukee, WI 53202
414-290-5393 tel | 414-224-9097 fax | amatson@milwaukeerep.com

Website: www.milwaukeerep.com | Facebook: www.facebook.com/milwrep | Twitter: twitter.com/milwrep

 


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http://www.milwaukeerep.com/On-Stage/2015-16-Season/Dreamgirls/

 

Dance with the Stars

Saturday October 3rd 2pm-3pm

Milwaukee Rep – Rehearsal Hall 3

 

Come visit Milwaukee Rep’s rehearsal halls and learn some of the dance moves from Dreamgirls from Leonard Sullivan, our very own dance captain! All skills levels welcome, ages 10 to 100. Come dressed to move. RSVP to lhoffmann@milwaukeerep.com by September 28th at the latest. Space is limited. First come, first serve.

 

Sing the Dreamgirls Songs

Saturday October 10th 2pm-3pm

Milwaukee Rep – Rehearsal Hall 3

 

Work with musicians and actors from Dreamgirls to learn a song from Dreamgirls, meet fellow singers, and hear what Dreamgirls music can sound like with a full choral sound! All skill levels welcome, ages 10 to 100. RSVP to lhoffmann@milwaukeerep.com by October 5th at the latest. Space is limited. First come, first serve.

 

Singing Contest

Post a video of you singing a song in the style of Dreamgirls to Facebook or Twitter by October 14th using #dreamgirlsmke and tagging @MilwRep. We will pick the best singers to win tickets to the Thursday October 29th performance and to perform on the set of Dreamgirls after the show.

 

 

LEDA HOFFMANN | Director of Community Engagement | Milwaukee Repertory Theater
Patty & Jay Baker Theater Complex | 108 East Wells Street | Milwaukee, WI 53202
414.224.1761 x338 tel | 414.224.9097 fax | lhoffmann@milwaukeerep.com

Website: www.milwaukeerep.com | Facebook: www.facebook.com/milwrep | Twitter: twitter.com/milwrep


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Milwaukee Rep Education - Adult Training Program
Fall classes now open for enrollment!

Acting for the Camera with Sam Kozel 
Mondays, September 14, 21, 28, October 5, 12, 19

Basic Acting I
Tuesdays, September 15, 22, 29, October 6, 13, 20

Directing with Leda Hoffmann
Thursdays, October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, November 5

For more information or to register, visit: www.milwaukeerep.com/courses/

LAST CHANCE TO REGISTER!

Space is limited. Registration deadline fast approaching!

The Rep’s THE AMISH PROJECT has captivated Milwaukee audiences…

Now come learn from the artists! 

Leda

DIRECTING with Leda Hoffmann                                             

Wednesdays, March 4 – April 8, 6:00 – 8:00 PM

$175 

From page to stage, learn the fundamentals of directing through

workshopping scenes from a contemporary play.

 Jill

 DIALECTS with Jill Zager                                                            Mondays, March 2 & 9, 6:00 – 8:00 PM

$75

Journey across the world and explore four dialects essential for any actor’s toolbox: RP, Cockney, German, & French.

To register, please visit:

http://www.milwaukeerep.com/courses/ or call 414.290.5398


3 Great Saturday Intensives @ The Rep for Local Actors
 
Nationally recognized Fight Director Jamie Cheatham on Unarmed Stage Combat, Rep Dialect Coach Jill Walmsley Zager on 3 British Isle dialects, and 3 leading professionals – JC Clementz, Laura Gordon, and Jim McCaffrey of Stewart Talent in Chicago – help you with “Getting the Next Gig.”  Register @ http://www.milwaukeerep.com/courses/ .

Dialect Intensive

Saturday Intensive

Instructor: Jill Walmsley Zager

April 12, 2014

Noon – 3 PM

Cost: $60

 

Received Pronunciation, also known as Standard British or BBC English, is one of themost needed dialects for an American actor to master, and yet it proves oftentimes to be one of the most difficult. There is a wealth of great dramatic literature requiring the Irish dialects, and recently there has been more of a need for actors to become adept at the Scottish dialects. Come explore the range of similarities and differences in these dialects of the British Isles withMilwaukee Rep’s Dialect Coach Jill Walmsley Zager .  

 

Jill Walmsley Zager’s  Milwaukee Rep credits include: ARaisin in the Sun, Clybourne Park, Sense and Sensibility, A Christmas Carol, The Diary of Anne Frank, The Mountaintop, Assassins, To Kill a Mockingbird, Lombardi, Yellowman, Ten Chimneys, The 39 Steps, My Name Is Asher Lev, Laurel and Hardy and Cabaret. Jill has recently returned to Milwaukee from three years as the Co-Head of Voice and Dialects and the Company Coach at the American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco. Regionally, she has worked at Chicago Shakespeare Theater, Steppenwolf Theatre Company, Lyric Opera of Chicago, Marriott Theatre in Lincolnshire, Drury Lane Water Tower, Apple Tree Theatre, Drury Lane Theatre & Conference Center, Utah Shakespeare Festival and Milwaukee Chamber Theatre. Jill earned her Master’s Degrees at Central School of Speech & Drama (London) and Northwestern. She is married to James Zager, the Head of the Theatre Program at Carroll University.

 

 

Unarmed Stage Combat Intensive

Saturday Intensive

Instructor: Jamie Cheatham

March 22, 2014

Noon – 3 PM

Cost: $60

 

This workshop, led by nationally recognized Fight Director and SAFD Certified Teacher Jamie Cheatham, will be an introduction to the craft of unarmed stage combat. Focus will be on safety as well as techniques necessary to create the illusion of violence. Movement and acting skills are also a part of this physical storytelling.

 

Jamie Cheatham was based in New York City as a fight director, teacher and actor before moving to Wisconsin in 2003. He has over twenty years experience as a professional, classically trained actor (AEA, SAG-AFTRA) and fight director. His fight work includes such theaters as the New York Shakespeare Festival, the Alley Theatre (TX), Actor’s Theatre of Louisville (KY), many regional Shakespeare festivals, and recently the Milwaukee Ballet. He has taught in several MFA acting programs, privately in New York City, and is currently the head of acting at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside. 

 

 

Getting the Next Gig – Audition Panel Intensive

Saturday Audition

Instructors: JC Clementz, Laura Gordon, and Jim McCaffery

April 5, 2014

Noon – 4PM

Cost: $60

 

Have you ever wondered what the people on the other side of the table actually thought about your audition?  Ever wish you knew what to do in order to improve your chances of being cast for the next one?  Here’s your opportunity to learn that and more.  JC Clementz (Casting Director for Milwaukee Repertory Theater), Laura Gordon (Freelance Director, Actor, and Rep Associate Artist), and Jim McCaffrey (Casting Agent for Stewart Talent in Chicago) give each participant direct feedback on 2 contrasting audition pieces.  Please no songs for this one.   Space is limited.

 

How It Works:

You have 5 minutes to introduce yourself, slate and perform your two audition pieces.  The panelists then have the next 5 minutes to fill out a response form, rating your audition on technical aspects, choice of material, and offering suggestions for improvement.  You will receive all three forms following your audition to help prepare you to get the next gig.  On Friday, April 4th you will receive your exact audition time. 

 

 

JC Clementz is the Artistic Associate: Casting & Artistic Intern Company Director at Milwaukee Repertory Theater. He most recently directed Forever Plaid in their Stackner Cabaret, where he will be directing The Doyle and Debbie Show next season. Also at The Rep, he has assistant directed Othello, To Kill A Mockingbird, A Christmas Carol, and Yellowman. As a stage manager, JC has traveled throughout Europe as the Assistant Stage Manager for New York Harlem Productions’ international tour of Porgy and Bess (dir. Baayork Lee). Prior to his arrival in Milwaukee, he spent a season at Philadelphia’s Walnut Street Theatre working in the casting and literary office. JC holds an MFA in Directing from Western Illinois University.

 

Laura Gordon is a Milwaukee based actor and director, whose directing credits include Venus in Fur, Speaking in Tongues, Almost Maine, Seascape, Laurel and Hardy, Gutenberg! the Musical! (Milwaukee Rep); Love’s Labour’s Lost, The Winter’s Tale (Utah Shakespeare Festival); In the Next Room or the vibrator play (Actors Theater of Louisville); Skin Tight, Memory House (Renaissance Theaterworks); Red, Going to St. Ives (Forward Theater); Richard III (Notre Dame Shakespeare Festival).   Her acting credits include Margie in Good People,  Linda Loman in Death of a Salesman, Elizabeth Proctor in The Crucible, Sister Aloysius in Doubt, Lane in The Clean House, Charlotta in The Cherry Orchard, Elizabeth in Richard III, Maureen in The Beauty Queen of Leenane, Queen Elizabeth I in Mary Stuart, Stevie in The Goat.  Laura is a Lunt-Fontanne Fellow and an Associate Artist with the Milwaukee Repertory Theater.  She is a member of SDC and Actors Equity Association.

 

Jim McCaffrey has been an agent for the past three years at Stewart Talent, the largest agency in the Midwest, representing actors for film, TV, theatre, and commercials.  His clients can be seen on TV in NBC’s Chicago Fire, Chicago PD, Crisis, and Betrayal, Showtime’s Fargo, ABC’s Mind Games, USA’s Sirens, and much more, in addition to countless national commercials, Broadway plays and musicals, feature films, and major regional stages across the country.  Prior to working as an agent, he worked in the casting department of the Goodman Theatre, and as a professional stage manager and actor in New York and internationally.  Jim is a graduate from Temple University in Philadelphia, and holds a BA in Theatre with a minor in Business Administration.