Archives for category: List Serve

The Milwaukee Rep is hosting a specialty course in addition to our normal Adult Acting Classes. If you’ve ever wanted to try your hand at Rapier work, we’ve got the class for you! No prerequisite or previous training required. If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to reach out,

Focused around the European sword play instruction of the 17th Century, the transition rapier incorporates techniques from early medieval warfare as well as the teachings of duelists of the 18th Century. It is because of this that the rapier is one of the most commonly used swords in Elizabethan plays. This class is a comprehensive study of the skills required to perform and act a stage combat duel utilizing a rapier. Weapons will be provided. There will be an opportunity to test for a Level 1 Certification with Dueling Arts International. NOTE: Only ten spots available due to the number of weapons.

Instructor: JJ Gatesman
Class Fee: $200
Prerequisite: None
Next session: Tuesdays, March 27, April 3, 10, 17, 24, May 1, 6:00-8:00pm

To register, please visit:–Learn/Business–Adult-Training/Adult-Classes/



The Summit Players will be holding auditions for their 2018 Summer Shakespeare in the State Parks production of Twelfth Night on Sunday, March 18th, from 2 – 5pm at the Village Church, 130 East Juneau Ave., Milwaukee.  *

Summit Players is looking for enthusiastic actors/teaching artists with a spirit of adventure, who love Shakespeare and the great outdoors.  In our 75 minute high energy productions the company of 6 actors cover all of the 14+ roles in the play.  Actors are also responsible to help lead the Educational Workshops held prior to each public performance.  There is a stipend of up to $150 per week.

Interested actors should email  to obtain an audition slot.  Please attach a picture and resume if you have one.  Actors chosen to audition will need to prepare one Shakespearean monologue (preferably verse) of no more than 2 minutes in length, as well as 16 bars of a song that shows your range (a cappella).  Actors interested in auditioning need to be available for the commitment as described below. 

  • Rehearsals run evenings and weekends from Monday, May 21 through Thursday, June 21, approximately 25 hours per week.  This schedule allows for actors in the company to have a job on weekdays.
  • Performances are weekends from June 22 to July 1, followed by a short break, and then continue July 13 through August 12.
  • This is a touring production that goes to 17 different State Parks all over Wisconsin.   Several of our performance weekends you will be on the road in order to get to the parks that are further afield.  Transportation, food and lodging are included on these travel weekends in addition to your weekly stipend.
  • Once open, there are brush-up rehearsals on Thursday evenings as needed.

For more information on the company please check out:


*Carol Zippel from Windfall Theatre will also be in attendance observing potential talent for their 2018-19 season.

Richard III (drunk) auditions

Auditions: Monday, March 19th 5:30-8:00 – sign up to reserve an audition time

Callbacks: Tuesday, March 20th 6:00-10:00 (may end earlier)


Visit to sign up


After a long and bloody civil war, peace has finally settled over England with the ascension of the York king Edward IV.  But Edward’s younger brother Richard resents the happiness he sees around him.  Bitter at being treated as a monster since birth due to his physical appearance, Richard chooses to embrace his villainous reputation and when he sets his eyes on the throne of England, nothing and no one will stand in his way.  As the body count rises, allies turn to enemies and Richard’s rule faces a new threat descended from old enemies – a young rival named Henry Tudor, Duke of Richmond.  The two men will soon face each other on the battlefield in a fight for the fate of all England.


This production will incorporate extensive double casting and nontraditional casting.  Actors of all ages, body types, genders, races, and physical abilities are encouraged to audition. Real alcohol will be consumed onstage. Many roles including that of Richard will require drinking but non-drinking roles are available.  Richard III performs May 24-June 2. Rehearsals begin April 16.  All actors interested in roles which require sword fighting must attend fight class in April (at no cost).


Auditions will be held at the Underground Collaborative on the lower level of the Shops of Grand Avenue – 161 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53203.

Please prepare a classical monologue of no more than 2 minutes and bring a headshot and resume.  You may also be asked to read from the script.

Plan on arriving at least 10 minutes prior to your audition to sign in and fill out a short form.

For more information contact


Date: 03/19/2018 (Mon.)

Location: Underground Collaborative at the Shops of Grand Avenue – 161 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53203


Auditions for Skylight Music Theatre, Milwaukee Chamber Theatre, and Renaissance Theaterworks


DATE: Thursday, March 8th, 2018, 10:00am – 6:00pm (break from 1:00pm-2:00pm)


APPOINTMENTS:  Email Sam Nykiel at (preferred) or call 414-299-4959.


SEEKING: Adult performers for 2018-2019 seasons.


PREPARATION: Prepare any combination of material as follows:

–              1 song and 1 monologue

–              2 contrasting songs

–              2 contrasting monologues

Material should not exceed 5-minute audition time slot.

Please bring 3 headshots and resumes.


LOCATION: Broadway Theatre Center

158 N Broadway

Milwaukee, WI 53202

Street parking only.  Please leave ample time for parking as it can be tricky in the area.


PERSONNEL: Ray Jivoff and Sam Nykiel from Skylight Music Theatre, C. Michael Wright from Milwaukee Chamber Theatre, and Suzan Fete, Mallory Metoxen and Bailey Wegner from Renaissance Theaterworks.

An accompanist will be provided.


PRODUCTION DATES: Please see each theatre’s website for additional information on shows.


BTC’s EPA’s are a color inclusive, ability inclusive, and gender inclusive audition. Please let Sam know if access services are needed.

At the Zoological Society of Milwaukee


Kohl’s Wild Theater (KWT) is seeking experienced professional actors to join the KWT acting company. Auditions will be held on Tuesday, February 27th. Actors in the KWT Company perform multiple roles in a variety of plays and musicals for young audiences. All roles are within an age range of 20-35. Experience with musical theater, puppetry, and comedy improv is a plus. For the audition, please prepare two contrasting musical theatre songs (16-32 bar cut) as well as two contrasting one-minute monologues. An accompanist will be provided. Callbacks will be held March 6th and 7th.


Actors will be considered for the spring/summer season which has three possible start dates on April 1st, April 15th, or May 14th. Different actors will be selected for different start dates based on actor availability and casting needs.


Auditions will be by appointment only. To schedule an appointment, actors should send their headshot and resume to and write “audition” in the subject line.


Program Information:


Kohl’s Wild Theater is a professional theater for young audiences that is a part of the education department of the Zoological Society of Milwaukee. Using drama, puppetry, and music, KWT teaches lessons on environmental conservation and the importance of caring for animals. KWT performs seven days per week during the summer months at the Milwaukee County Zoo and other venues in the community. During the school year, KWT tours to schools and other community organizations within a one-hour radius of the Zoo.


If cast, actors must have most daytimes available for rehearsals and performances. During the school year, most performance shifts occur on the weekdays between 6:30 AM and 4:30 PM. During the summer months, performances occur on weekdays and weekends. Once hired, actors join our part-time staff of professional actors that learn multiple shows and roles in a repertory format. Company members typically work 15-25 hours per week. Rehearsal and performance schedules are typically released four weeks in advance. Starting pay is $12 per hour. Additional benefits include flexible scheduling and professional development workshops.


Please visit for more information.



Dave McLellan

Theater Coordinator

Zoological Society of Milwaukee

10005 West Bluemound Road
Milwaukee, WI 53226

Phone: 414-258-5058 x429

Cell: 414-254-9936


Fax: 414-258-4004


Resident Technical Director


Job Description




The Resident Technical Director is a member of Sunset Playhouse’s full-time professional staff. This is a salaried, full-time position with comprehensive benefits.  Status “exempt”



General Responsibilities:


The Resident Technical Director is responsible for the technical aspects of productions produced by Sunset Playhouse, the premiere community theater in south eastern Wisconsin. Working within the established policies and procedures of the organization, with the assistance of staff and volunteers and with oversight by the Artistic Director, duties include, but are not limited to:  set design of 6 – 8 main stage productions per season, set build for 8 main stage productions, assist guest set and light designers as needed; maintain the technical shop area and equipment; recruit, train and utilize technical volunteers, provide general support of the overall production quality of the Sunset Playhouse; and assist in general maintenance of the facility. The Resident Technical Director will attend staff meetings




Education:        BA in Technical Theater with emphasis on design and construction or equivalent experience


Experience:   1-2 years’ experience in design/construction of sets.

                        Basic Understanding of light and sound board programs


Availability:   Varied hours based on theater calendar, including nights and weekends during tech weeks.


Certifications/Licenses: Valid Driver’s License Knowledge, Skills, & Abilities



  • Ability to recruit, train, and retain technical staff and volunteers
  • Ability to multi-task/ strong organizational skills
  • Ability to adhere to schedules and meet all production deadlines
  • Working knowledge of Google docs and Microsoft Office.


Physical Demands


Manual Dexterity:        Ability to use a computer, write instructions, complete forms.


Physical Effort:             Walking, climbing stairs and ladders, reaching, lifting.  Ability to lift 50lbs.


Working Conditions: Must be comfortable working in an open office environment.


Hazards:                        None.




About The Sunset Playhouse: Sunset Playhouse was established in 1960 as Southeastern Wisconsin’s premiere community theater.  The Playhouse has evolved since those early days into a community arts complex presenting a mix of community theater and professional theater/music events.  Additionally, the Playhouse is an important player in theater arts education through its School for The Arts and bug in a rug Children’s Theater Series.  The Playhouse produces approximately 26 live productions each season, as well as a number of special concerts and fundraising events.  Sunset offers opportunities to guest directors and designers and counts over 600 volunteers in the Sunset Playhouse family.

For more information, please contact:   Nancy Visintainer-Armstrong, Artistic Director


To apply for the Resident Designer/Technical Director position:

Submit cover letter, resume, salary requirements, and three references by February 16, 2018 to: Nancy Visintainer-Armstrong, Artistic Director


Hope Summer Rep 2018 Season Breakdown


2 one minute monologues (1 must be Shakespeare)

36 bars of up tempo musical theatre song

*Dance call will be held in callbacks



AEA SPT TIER 3 – $413-per week minimum.

NON AEA Professional Company – $180-$250 per week

Young Company –  $125-$175 per week

Intern Company – $1000 stipend plus 3 college credits


Housing is included.

EMC Points Available





Directed by: Marcus Denard Johnson





AUNT EM: Female, Mid 30’s (Range: Mezzo Soprano, G3-C5)

Dorothy’s Aunt. Life has not been easy for her and promises little else. Harsh towards Dorothy at times, but acts out of love.


DOROTHY: Female (Range:  Mezzo Soprano, G3-B5)

Bright eyed and alive as can be. Would rather remain a child as long as possible instead of accepting the responsibilities of adulthood.


UNCLE HENRY: Male, (Range: Non-Singing)

Dorothy’s Uncle. Physically run down from years of hard work on the farm. Often acts as the voice of reason towards Aunt Em.


ADDAPERLE: Female, (Range: Mezzo Soprano, F3-C5)

Good Witch of the North. Has magic powers she refers to as “doing tricks.” Her magic abilities don’t always pan out as well as she would like them to.


SCARECROW: Male, (Range: Tenor, D3-A4)
Tired of being a scarecrow and the prospect of not going anywhere. Embarks on the journey to see The Wiz in hopes he can provide a brain.


TIN MAN: Male, (Range: Baritone, E3-A4)

Human at one time. Lost all his limbs to a cursed axe. Joins in the journey in hopes the Wiz will provide him a heart because “it isn’t enough to be good looking.”


LION: Male, (Range: Baritone, G2-Bb4)

Travels around the jungle scaring people, but has “a yellow streak a mile wide.” Coward state stems from deeper mother issues and gets regular counseling from an owl. Joins in the journey to see the Wiz to gain some courage.


GATEKEEPER: Male, (Range: Non-Singing)

Guards the gate to the Emerald City.


THE WIZ: Female/Male, (Range: Tenor/Alto, C3-A4)

All powerful leader over the land of Oz. Hides his true nature behind the façade of a temperamental leader. His true identity is an enigma.


EVILLENE: Female, Age Flexible (Range: Alto, Bb3-Db5)

Wicked Witch of the West. Low-down evil. Not a kind bone in her body nor kind thought in her rotten mind.


LORD HIGH UNDERLING: Male, Age Flexible (Range: Non-Singing)

Weak coward. Evillene’s number one.


WINGED MONKEY Male/Female (Range: Non-Singing)

Servant of the Wicked Witch of the West. Summoned to do her bidding. The mere mention of him brings fear. Strong movement/Dance skills.


GLINDA: Female, (Range: Alto, C4-Eb5)

Good Witch of the South. Prettiest of all the witches. Very wise in the way of show-business.





Directed by: Jahnna Beecham



Felix Unger – A fussy man who knows that he is difficult to live with but cannot—or will not—make any concessions or compromises. His wife, unwilling to continue their marriage, asks him to leave the family despite his suicide threat, and he then moves in with Oscar. Made comical by his exaggerated behavior, Felix is persuaded by the end of the play to live temporarily with the Pigeon sisters, who pity him, but it is probable that they too will find him exasperating.

Gwendolyn Pigeon – Oscar and Felix’s giggly upstairs neighbor, one of a pair of English sisters. She is a widow.

Cecily Pigeon – Oscar and Felix’s giggly upstairs neighbor, one of a pair of English sisters. She is a divorcée.

Speed – One of Oscar and Felix’s poker buddies. Gruff and sarcastic, often picking on Vinnie and Murray.

Murray – A NYPD policeman, one of Oscar and Felix’s poker buddies.

Roy – One of Oscar and Felix’s poker buddies. Oscar’s accountant. Roy has a dry wit but is less acerbic than Speed.

Vinnie – One of Oscar and Felix’s poker buddies. Vinnie is mild-mannered and henpecked, making him an easy target for Speed’s verbal barbs.




Directed by: Lenny Banovez



Actor: Role is already cast.


Musician: Looking for Actor/Musician to play Cello. Must be strong sight reader.



Director: Lenny Banovez


Looking for a diverse and talented ensemble of 10-15 actor/singer/dancers to play a variety of roles.



Theatre for Young Audience Show is DRAGON PACK SNACK ATTACK. A World Premiere Musical Adaptation from the best-selling children’s book. This production will be performed by the 2018 HSRT Young & Intern Companies.

Follow this link to sign up:


My name is Bonnie Scholz, and I am currently the Principal of Catholic Central High School in Burlington, Wisconsin, but I have a long history in the Performing Arts through Pius XI HS and the Milwaukee Arts Community. We are looking for a Marketing and Communications Director to add to our Advancement Team at our High School, and I know arts folks are some of the best folks to work with! Here is the job description. Thank you for getting the word out to the arts community!

Catholic Central High School
Marketing and Communications Director
As of 1/9/18

Catholic Central High School in Burlington, Wisconsin is seeking a dynamic, Marketing and Communications Director to join our Advancement Team. This person will position our school as a leading academic and religious institution in Racine and Walworth counties and advance its mission to form students in the Catholic faith, arm them with rigorous, academic knowledge and steep our students in our almost 100 year tradition.

Job Summary

Create, coordinate, implement and measure the success of a comprehensive marketing, communications and public relations program that will enhance Catholic Central’s image and position in the marketplace, the wider Catholic community of the Archdiocese of Milwaukee, and the general public.

Ensure articulation of Catholic Central’s desired image and position, assure consistent communication of image and position throughout our organization, all constituencies, both internal and external.

Primary Relationships

This position reports to the Principal and serves as a member of the Advancement Team, which consists of: The Principal, The Academic Dean, The Admissions Director, The Development Director, The School Counselor and The Business Manager.

This position works with the Board of Directors, The BOD Executive Committee and other committees in charting the direction of the school, assuring its accountability to all constituencies, and ensuring its effective operation.

This position cultivates working relationships with external communication outlets including: the Archdiocese of Milwaukee, parishes, parish schools, pastors, grade school leaders, prospective families and students, other prospective organizations and the media.

Planning and Budgeting

This position is responsible for forwarding the mission and vision of the school, as well as the marketing, communication and financial goals as they relate to the mission. This position is also responsible for putting evaluation systems in place that mark the progress and effectiveness of communications and marketing objectives, and reports this progress back to the Principal, the Advancement Team and the Board of Directors.

This position develops short and long term plans and budgets for marketing and communications initiatives, public relation programs, recruiting events, recruiting materials, development projects, and media campaigns such as the school’s website and social media advertising and promotion. This position monitors the progress and success of these initiatives, and evaluates performance.

This position works with faculty and staff to coordinate the appearance of all of the school’s print and electronic materials such as: letterhead, use of logo, athletic apparel, brochures, etc.

This position develops, coordinates and oversees programs, technical assistance and resource materials to assist school groups such as the arts, athletics, clubs and other organizations in the marketing, communications and positioning of their activities and fund raisers.

This position plans and executes regular contact with target media, and coordinates appropriate responses to media requests.

This position keeps informed of developments in the fields of marketing, communications and public relations, not-for-profit management and governance, Archdiocesan tools and support systems, and uses information to help the school operate with initiative and innovation. In addition, this position conducts relevant market research and keeps apprised of trends that affect the organization.

Skill Set

A passion for K-12 Catholic Education and a vested interest in a growth model in the Racine and Walworth county area. A general knowledge of the Catholic Church, and active participation in a Catholic Parish preferred.

A collaborative team member with a growth mindset and excellent, written and oral communication skills.

Demonstrated skills, knowledge and experience in the design and execution of marketing, communications and public relations budgets and activities.

Experience overseeing the design and production of print materials, publications, press releases, presentations and successful negotiation with media.

The ability to manage multiple projects at the same time, and deliver high quality results on time.


Undergraduate degree in communications, marketing, public relations, journalism, or related field required. Graduate degree in a related field is desirable. A minimum of three to five years professional experience in communication field required, including proven writing, editing and project management.

Knowledge and understanding of contemporary electronic forms of communication, including social media, is required.

Proficiency in Adobe Suite including: Photoshop, Illustrator and In Design as well as Microsoft Office Suite. Familiar with basic html and web applications, and capable of overseeing web site content and basic modifications and updates.

Membership in IABC (International Association of Business Communicators) and IABC accreditation are desirable.

Be prepared to show samples of work at the time of the interview.

Apply to:
Bonnie J. Scholz, Principal
Catholic Central High School
148 McHenry St.
Burlington, WI 53105

(262) 763-1510 X. 222

Have a play, idea, or movement piece your itching to try out? 


Attention Cooperative Performance Artist Members! 

We are now accepting proposals for our 2018-2019 season. If you are interested in submitting, please contact Eric Scherrer at to receive preliminary information about the pitch process and expectations, along with an example presentation.

Drink, be merry, and listen to some creative ideas! Only members are allowed to pitch a project for the season but anyone can participate! After pitch presentations, members and non-members are allowed to vote for their favorite projects with tokens. Members receive 5 voting tokens and Non-Members receive 2. The five projects with the most tokens at the end of the night move on to the Board of Directors for consideration and final selection for the upcoming season!

Deadline for submissions is January 7, 2018. 

Thank you for your continued support and can’t wait to what innovative ideas are in store!
Sunday, January 28th

Riverwest Public House
815 E Locust St, Milwaukee, WI

  • In order to submit a project for our 2018-2019 season, you must be a member of Cooperative Performance.
  • Any member submitting a pitch must be present at the 2018 Pitch Event.
  • Not a member yet? You may submit a proposal to be considered if you pay membership dues by the time of the pitch event!
Please contact Eric Scherrer at to submit proposals and have any questions answered.

The Milwaukee Generals are almost upon us, so I thought now would be a good time to revisit some thoughts on auditioning.  Here are my thoughts from a couple of years ago.  I’ve done a bit of judicial editing, but my thoughts on this process haven’t changed that much.  Hope it helps.




Having attended the Milwaukee Generals for over a decade now, I’ve come across all sorts of things that auditionees do which sabotage the work at hand.  I’m continually amazed by some of these gaffs, but to be fair, how could they know?  I understand just how hard and awful the process of auditioning is having been an actor for the last 35 years.  To that end I’ve decided to share some of the dos and don’ts of auditioning.  I throw in the caveat that these are strictly from my own viewpoint and that while they deal with auditioning in general, they are specific to the peculiarities of myself and the Milwaukee Generals.


I’m dividing this “tutorial” into three parts: the Introduction, the Headshot and Resume, and the Audition.


The Introduction 


If you have the chance (and that’s a big if) take a peek at the room you are going to walk into ahead of time.  Auditioning is an intimidating thing and walking into a room blind is hateful.  Find out where the auditors are going to be sitting and figure out where you are going to sit or stand.  Find out if there is a chair available and what kind it is.  Nothing worse than preparing a piece that requires you to spin a chair around and sit on it backwards only to find out that the chair has arms.  For those of you new to the Milwaukee Generals, you are walking into a room to face a group of auditors in a horseshoe configuration. 


If you walk into the room and you find that there are auditors behind you, you’ve come in too far.  Back up so that we can see your face.


Take your time introducing yourself and your pieces.  Know that we are furiously passing your headshots around as quickly as we can, flipping them over, and pouring over your resume and then trying to catch what pieces you are going to do and, in many cases, trying to jot that info down.  We see a lot of auditions during the course of the day, and it’s extremely difficult to keep them straight.  Give us a chance to remember you.  I’ll never fault an auditionee for taking his or her time introducing their pieces.  When in doubt, wait until the majority of us have finished and are looking back up at you before you begin your first piece.


Don’t undress in the room.  This is a rather new phenomenon that has started happening lately.  When you walk into the room, be prepared to go.  I don’t want to see you come in, and then slowly take off a coat, scarf, shirt or any other item of clothing as you are introducing yourself.  That’s weird and distracting.  Leave that stuff outside.


This is for both your intro and exit; don’t apologize for your audition.  Look, you only get one shot at this, so no matter how poorly you’ve prepared or think you’ve done during the audition, do it boldly and with a smile on your face.  I can’t tell you how many people come into the room with the body language of, “Uh, hi.  I don’t really know why I’m here and I’m sorry to waste your time.”  Conversely, I’ve seen a lot of people who have finished a perfectly fine audition and then ruin it by sheepishly excusing themselves on the way out.  Don’t do it!  It sucks all of the energy out of your audition.


Generally speaking, goofy introductions and/or exits will fall flat and have a good chance of being irritating.  I know it’s a defensive thing, but just don’t do it.  Come in, smile and introduce yourself.  When you are finished, say thank you.  Resist the urge to ask us if we have any questions or if there’s anything else we’d like to see.  Trust me; if we have those questions we won’t let you leave the room until we know the answers.


Give us the info we need.  It has become fashionable of late to name the play your audition is from, but not the part; or worse yet, not tell us anything at all.  This seems particularly true of Shakespeare.  Don’t make it a guessing game.  Conversely, don’t give us too much information.  In most cases I don’t need to know the author and I certainly don’t need to be told that Hamlet was written by Shakespeare.  And occasionally an auditionee will give us a summary of the piece they are about to give.  Nope, don’t do it.


While we are on the subject of introducing your pieces, proceed to do your pieces in the order in which they were introduced.  Different auditors are there for different reasons.  Shakespeare companies have less interest in your modern/comic piece and are waiting for the Macbeth you are going to do.  If you say you are going to do your classical piece second, do so.  They may use that brief period of time while you are performing your first piece to scan your resume and see what other classical pieces you have done and where.


Oftentimes the audition goes wrong during the intro.  I spend a whole day with my students having them do nothing but walking into a room and introducing themselves.  This is surprisingly difficult, and few people spend any time on that part of their audition.  Auditionees actually stumble over their names, forget what pieces they are doing, mispronounce the playwright’s name (which is just one more reason that info is unnecessary), mumble their info in such a way that we can’t understand it or turn their back and drag a chair across the room while making their intro.  Enter the room.  If you are going to use a chair make a decision; either get the chair, pick it up and set it where you want and then introduce yourself, or introduce yourself and then get set.  Trust me; we will welcome the extra time to look at your resume.


Unless we stand up and stick our hands out, no need to come over and shake our hands.  As I’ve stated, we’re going to a whole lot of people over the course of this very long day.  There are also upwards of twenty people in that room and you won’t want to shake all of our hands.


The Headshot and Resume 


Look like your headshot.  It’s bothersome when you don’t.  You’re a little heavier than you’d like to be?  So what.  Maybe we’re looking for just that heavy person.  It’s going to be very difficult to remember you later if you don’t look like your headshot.


Staple or glue your resume to your headshot.  I can’t tell you how irritating it is to get a loose resume.  Or worse yet, one in which the resume is paper-clipped to the headshot, actually covering the headshot.  It does nothing but make you look unprofessional and your audition might fail right there before you even get in the room.  And take the time to trim it to fit.  I file these away and those odd sized ones just might not make it into my filing cabinet.


While we’re on the subject of attaching your resume, don’t attach anything else.  I’m really happy you’re currently employed with your one-man show, but I don’t want a flyer or postcard attached advertising said show.


Leave whitespace on your resume.  We’re doing everything we can to remember the interesting things about you in case we should want to cast you.  If you jamb-pack your resume from margin to margin we have no room for such notes.  It also makes them hard to read and smacks of desperation.  “Look how much I’ve done!”  We don’t need to know everything you’ve done and if you have stuff on there from twenty years ago you might think about some judicial editing.


Use a decent sized font.  We’re at this all day and my eyes get tired.  If you give me an 8 point font I’ll want to throw your resume in the discard pile then and there.  Also, weird or funny fonts are irritating.  It just adds an extra hurdle where I don’t need one.  And if you use comic sans I will throw your resume away.


There is a somewhat uniform way of setting up your resume.  Feel free to diverge, but just know that doing so will increase the likelihood that I won’t be able to find the info I’m looking for.  At the top should be your name and under that your vitals.  Height, weight, eye color, hair color, telephone and email address.  If you are a singer you may want to put your vocal range.  Do not give us your address.  In this day and age that simply isn’t safe and every now and then you send your resume to an unscrupulous person who turns around and sells your resume to other places.  Don’t include your age or tell us what your age range is.  That’s our job and why would you want to limit yourself that way?  Likewise, don’t include the dates of your productions.


Below your name and vitals should come the body of your resume which is your stage experience.  There are four things I want to know here: the theatre you worked at, the show you performed in, the part you played, and who directed you.  Set them up in neat columns so that I can easily scan through them.  Don’t be afraid to list multiple shows with one theatre, that’s a good thing; that says that you worked at that theatre and they liked you enough to ask you back.  I am very leery of the auditionee that has 30 theatres listed and has only one show at each of them.


Below the stage experience section should be your education and special skills.  Still in high school?  It’s okay, we won’t hold it against you, so don’t be ashamed of it.  Tell us where you went to school and who some of your teachers were, but leave your GPA off.  Those names may open up a conversation.  I’m not really interested if you took a weekend class here or there.  Special skills should be special.  I don’t know how special having a driver’s license is.  Fire eating is more impressive (although at this last audition every other person had that listed) and I certainly want to know if you can speak a foreign language fluently.  I assume a good actor can learn dialects, so for me I don’t really care.

You may have a lot of film and/or TV credits; you may have a lot of directing credits.  I don’t care.  I’m here to audition stage actors.  In this day and age you should be able to have several different resumes at your disposal.  If you are coming to the Milwaukee Generals, cater your resume to your clients, which are almost exclusively theatres.


Have enough resumes.  We don’t like sharing.


Don’t lie on your resume.  You will be busted and then you’ve lost all credibility.  If you took a weekend class don’t make it sound like you received a degree.  If you took a beginning improv class don’t say you are part of the troupe.  If you were Gregory in Romeo and Juliet once upon a time, don’t claim that you are a trained fighter.  You’re not.  We know, we always know.


The Audition 


So now we come to the heart of the matter.  First know that within the first ten or fifteen seconds we know if we like you or not.  Sometimes we’ve already made up our minds during the intro.  That’s just the way it goes.  Knowing that, limit the length of your pieces.  They really should be no longer than a minute a piece.  I spent one whole afternoon timing auditions.  I would look down at my watch when I started to lose interest and it was always between 55 and 65 seconds.  Even if you’re great, going beyond that is too much.  In the past, many people were going over three minutes and that was just for one of their pieces.  Leave us wanting more.


In picking your pieces be very selective.  If you choose something offensive it is likely to offend and turn off at least a few people in the room.  Have a really good reason for picking such a piece. Of course if you are still looking for a piece right now you are probably in trouble.


Don’t do stand up.  I’ve never seen it work and theatre is not stand up.  I’ve also never seen a piece that an actor has written for themselves work.


Contrast your pieces.  That doesn’t mean that one has to be modern comic and the other classical dramatic.  You can contrast two modern funny pieces and I will be quite delighted.  But standing during one and sitting during the other is not contrast.  Show us two different sides of yourself and hopefully those two pieces are different than your introduction.  Remember that your intro is a chance to show us a different side of yourself that will be contrasted by your two pieces.  Prove that you can act.


Don’t do serial killer monologues.  They are overdone and not usually all that interesting.


Don’t find a monologue in a monologue book.  They generally aren’t very good and they are overused.  Nothing like seeing the same bad monologue four times in the same day.  Read plays, lots of them, and find something that speaks to you.


People bend over backwards trying to find the obscure Shakespeare piece that no one has ever seen.  In doing so they generally go to some of Shakespeare’s lesser known plays.  You know why they are lesser known?  Because they’re not as good.  You know what I’ve never seen?  Someone audition with “To be or not to be.”


Don’t wear anything that is more disturbing or more interesting than you are.  I’ll spend the whole audition wondering, “Why did he wear that?” instead of watching your audition.  Look nice, but make sure you are comfortable and can move around.  And men, unless you live in a suit and tie 24/7 and look great in it, don’t wear a suit and tie.  It always comes off as amateurish.


Your pieces should actually be scenes in which you are engaged in some kind of action as opposed to telling us a funny story.  I want to see your struggle, not your charming me with a funny anecdote.


Feel free to use me as your point of focus.  I will always sit in one of the corner seats for just that reason.  But know that not everyone is okay with that.  However, if you stand two feet in front of me and confront me, you’re going to lose me.  I’ll still stare straight at you and be the best auditor I can be, but I’m no longer really watching you.  I’m beginning to wonder if you’re crazy enough to jump the table, and others in the room are wondering the same thing.


After you are done with a piece do not say scene.  Worse yet, do not wave your hand in front of your face and say scene.


Do make your transitions clear and clean.  Do something, usually a physical move, to let us know one piece has ended and the next has begun.  Of course, if they are highly contrastable pieces, that shouldn’t be a problem.


If you have an emotional piece and are able to go to that place, good for you.  If you end that piece and take a long time coming out of it and composing yourself, showing us just how hard that it was to deliver that piece, I will no longer love you.


If you get off to a bad start, ask if you can start over.  We will always say yes.


No props.  We’ll see the letter in your hand if you are invested in your scene.  And never, ever, ever…NEVER! bring a gun into the room.  Especially not one loaded with a half-charge blank which you then hold to your head and pull the trigger.  Sigh.  It now needs to be said.


And that’s my spiel.  I’m sure other things will come to mind and I’ll update this from time to time.  I also welcome observations from other auditors whether they agree with me or not.  Know that during the course of my stumbling career, I have made many of these mistakes myself, and it was only because some kind person took me in hand that I got past some of them.  I’m still an awful auditioner.


Be bold and good luck.




P.S. The people in the room really want you to be good.  We’ve got a lot on our collective minds during the course of that very long day.  Please don’t read anything into our dour faces.  And know that if you come in with a bright smile and a chipper attitude we will immediately light up and take notice.