Archives for category: List Serve

nine fb cover

Theater RED Invites Milwaukee to “Be Italian!” with NINE the Musical

Directed by Theater RED’s New Artistic Associate, Eric Welch

 

Che bello! Theater RED proudly announces a new addition to the company! Eric Welch joins Theater RED as Artistic Associate following his collaboration with the company in June of 2018 for the Wisconsin premiere of I’LL EAT YOU LAST: A CHAT WITH SUE MENGERS. Eric Welch directed this one-woman comedic romp as a co-production with his theater company, Untitled Productions.

 

The great secret of NINE is that it took “8½” and became an essay on the power of women by answering the question, ‘What are women to men?’ And NINE tells you: they are our mothers, our sisters, our teachers, our temptresses, our judges, our nurses, our wives, our mistresses, our muses.

– Maury Yeston

 

Be Italian! New Theater RED Artistic Associate Eric Welch will direct NINE the musical, with music and lyrics by Maury Yeston and book by Arthur Kopit, in January of 2019. Reimagined with a cast of nine (9) women and one (1) man, NINE brings Theater RED alumni and newcomers together for a courageous, no-frills production that brings the core of Guido’s crisis to audiences up-close in Sunset Playhouse’s intimate Studio Theater.

 

Based on Italian director Federico Fellini’s comic masterpiece of biographical filmmaking, “8 ½”, Yeston’s sultry musical follows the life of world-famous film director Guido Contini as he prepares his latest picture. Contini is also, after recent box office failures, drifting towards a nervous breakdown. Contini has turned 40 and faces two crises: he has to shoot a film for which he can’t write the script, and his wife of 20 years, film star Luisa del Forno, may leave him if he can’t pay more attention to his marriage. As it turns out, it is the same crisis. Luisa’s efforts to talk to him seem to be drowned out by voices in his head: voices of women in his life, speaking through the walls of his memory: insistent, flirtatious, irresistible, potent. These are the women Guido loved, and from whom he derived the entire vitality of a creative life, now as stalled as his marriage. As his sanity disintegrates, he drifts into nostalgic reverie, eventually focusing on the formative sexual encounter of his life, which occurred at the age of 9.

 

Dates (three performances only):                Friday, January 25 at 7:30 PM Saturday, January 26 at 7:30 PM Sunday, January 27 at 2:00 PM

Tickets: $20 General Admission

Order online at https://sunsetplayhouse.com/shows/nine or by calling 262-782-4430

 

Location: Sunset Playhouse Studio Theater, 700 Wall Street, Elm Grove, WI 53122

 

Stage Direction: Music Direction: Choreography:
Eric Welch Lydia Rose Eiche Ashley Patin
Featuring:
Timothy J. Barnes as Guido Marcee Doherty-Elst as Serraghina Jennifer Larson as Mama Maddelena
Rae Elizabeth Paré as Luisa SaraLynn Evenson as Lilliane Le Fleur Hannah Esch as Our Lady of the Spa
Samantha Sostarich as Carla Laura McDonald as Guido’s Mother Carrie Gray as Lina Darling
Kara Ernst-Schalk as Claudia Marcee Doherty-Elst as Stephanie  

 

About NINE

NINE is a musical, initially created and written by Maury Yeston as a class-project in Lehman Engel’s BMI

Music Theatre Workshop in 1973. It was later developed with a book by Mario Fratti, and then again with a book by Arthur Kopit, music and lyrics by Maury Yeston. The story is based also on Frederico Fellini’s semi- autobiographical film . It focuses on film director Guido Contini, who is dreading his imminent 40th birthday and facing a mid-life crisis, which is blocking his creative impulses and entangling him in a web of romantic difficulties in early 1960s Venice.

 

The original Broadway production opened in 1982 and ran for 729 performances, and starred Raul Julia. The musical won five Tony Awards, including Best Musical and has enjoyed a number of revivals. The 2003

Broadway revival featured a star-studded cast: Antonio Banderas, Mary Stuart Masterson, Chita Rivera, Jane Krakwoski and Laura Benanti, and won 2 Tony Awards itself, including Best Revival of a Musical and Best Supporting Actress in a Musical (Jane Krakowski).

 

The movie [] has a phenomenal impact on me when I saw it as a teenager when it first came out. I was fascinated with Guido who was going through his second adolescence when I was going through my first! As I grew I began to realize that there was room to explore the reacting of the inner workings of the women in Guido’s wake…I think that’s what opened the gateways of creativity for NINE – to hear from these extraordinary women.

– Maury Yeston to the New York Times

 

About the Title

Fellini entitled his film 8 ½ in recognition of his prior body of work, which included six full-length films, two

short films, and one that he co-directed. Yeston’s title for the musical adaptation adds another half-credit to Fellini’s output and refers to Guido’s age during his first hallucination sequence. Yeston called the musical NINE, explaining that if you add music to , “it’s like half a number more.”

 

Getting There

The intimate 88-seat Studio Theater is located at Sunset Playhouse in Elm Grove, WI and is the sister

performance space to their larger 299-seat Furlan Auditorium. Sunset Playhouse is in the heart of the Elm Grove shopping district at 700 Wall Street with ample free parking available in their spacious parking lot. Sunset Playhouse is easily acceptable for patrons coming from all corners of the world (even Italy!). Visit https:// sunsetplayhouse.com/contact/map-directions for detailed, localized directions from the West, North, South, and East of Southeastern WI.

 

About Theater RED: Theater RED produces theater in Southeastern Wisconsin. Each production addresses three founding tenets: Substantial roles for women, growth in craft for artists, and support for new playwrights.

 

For more information: www.theaterred.com and www.sunsetplayhouse.com

For further information, contact: Marcee Doherty-Elst 414-617-0132 marcee@theaterred.com

 

 

Be Italian with Theater RED in January 2019!

 

Advertisements

adam qutaishat directing all arcadians

ALL IN PRODUCTIONS

is pleased to present:

 

WHAT IS WAIP?

 

Recorded once a month, WAIP is an ongoing semi-serialized variety show podcast produced by All In Productions. WAIP follows the exploits within a failing fictional Milwaukee radio station along with various episodic programming, parodies, skits and other outlandish content thrown in for good measure.

 

NEXT RECORDING:   Sunday January 27, 2018 Live Recording Begins @ 7:00pm at In Tandem Theatre, 628 N 10th St, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (Subsequent recordings are once a month on the final Sunday.)  Listen to all episodes of WAIP here https://soundcloud.com/aipmke

 

Directed and conceptualized by Adam Qutaishat, WAIP features some of Milwaukee’s finest established and up-and-coming talent by area actors, artists, and writers. Each episode of WAIP also features a special guest interview with a Milwaukee area theatre professional. Previous theatre guests include Ray Jivoff (Skylight Music Theatre), David Cecsarini (Next Act Theatre), Jill Anna Ponasik and Danny Brylow (Milwaukee Opera Theatre), Alyson Chavez (Milwaukee Ballet), Matt Kemple (Milwaukee Comedy Festival), Zach Thomas Woods (Kohl’s Wild Theatre), Marcee Doherty Elst (Theatre RED), Jason Powell (Milwaukee Metro Voices), Eric Welch (Untitled Productions), Alexis Forseth and Hannah Kubiak (Voices Found Repertory), Composer Paula Foley Tillen, and Jake Brockman and Kyle Conner (Forge Theatre).

 

Content of WAIP stretches from the ridiculous to the inexplicable and includes:

The struggling exploits of WAIP’s employees presented in sitcom-esque fashion.

All Arcadians, an ongoing fantasy satire.

The Worsener, a superhero parody series.

Time Ranger, a superhero parody series.

Dog Investigator, the hardboiled adventures of a canine detective and his past that just won’t leave him alone.

Other commercials, skits, radio plays and material include: Awkward Elevator Conversations, The Mournful Gene Lavender, Job Seekers, Robot Roommate, Long Tom Silvers, Packer Snackers, Fop on Pop, Court of the Dead, Inferior Flix, and Off Topic.

 

WHERE CAN YOU LISTEN TO WAIP?

 

Episodes of All In Productions’ WAIP are published bimonthly and can be heard worldwide free of charge on the music and audio platform SoundCloud at https://soundcloud.com/aipmke. It can also be found on iTunes, Stictcher, and more.

 

WHO PERFORMS WAIP?

 

WAIP regular and guest performers and writers include Tim Backes, Marcus Beyer, Becky Cofta, Kyle Conner, Hannah Esch, Alexis Furseth, Ana Gonzalez, Chris Goode, Kathryn Hausman, Hailey Hentz, Amanda J Hull, Mike Jones, Matthew Konkel, Hannah Kubiak, Beth Lewinski, Edward Lupella, Laura McDonald, Robby McGhee, Emmitt Morgans, Connor O’Hara, Rae Elizabeth Pare, Gage Patterson, Adam Qutaishat, Tim Rebers, David Sapiro, Zach Sharrock, Liz Shipe, Stephanie Staszak, Zach Thomas, Woods, Maddie Wakley, Hannah Shay, Casey Van Dam, Bob Zimmerman, Brant Allen, JJ Gatesman, and Ben Yela.

Cast and Crew of WAIP.jpg

Sound engineering and sound effects for WAIP are by Derek Buckles. WAIP is stage managed by Allison Kasprovich. Graphic design is by Cassie Pearson. Equipment for WAIP is provided Q Music, LLC.

 

WEBSITE: http://allin-mke.com/

 

 

 


jointauditions

Joint auditions for Bard & Bourbon’s

Julius Caesar (drunk) and The Tempest (drunk)

 

Auditions: Monday, January 28th 5:00pm-9:00pm – sign up at https://tinyurl.com/CaesarTempest  to reserve an audition time

Callbacks: Saturday, Feb 2nd 9am-12pm

 

If you attended Milwaukee General Auditions and performed a classical monologue, or have acted for Bard & Bourbon before, you do NOT need to attend initial auditions.  Instead, please email info@bardandbourbon.com to express interest in being considered for callbacks.

 

These productions will incorporate extensive double casting and nontraditional casting.  Actors of all ages, body types, genders, races, and physical abilities are encouraged to audition. Real alcohol will be consumed onstage. Non-drinking roles are available. 

 

Julius Caesar runs March 13-17

The Tempest runs May 22-26

 

Auditions will be held at the Underground Collaborative on the lower level of the Shops of Grand Avenue – 161 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53203.

Please prepare a classical monologue of no more than 2 minutes and bring a headshot and resume.  You may also be asked to read from the script.

Plan on arriving at least 10 minutes prior to your audition to sign in and fill out a short form.

 

For more information contact info@bardandbourbon.com

 

To sign up, visit https://tinyurl.com/CaesarTempest


john

Artist rates available for Bard & Bourbon’s

KING JOHN: a (drunk) Staged Reading

ONE WEEKEND ONLY!

January 18 & 19

7:30

Charles Allis Art Museum

1801 N Prospect Ave, Milwaukee, WI 53202

Bard & Bourbon begins our Drunk Shakespearean Histories series with King John.

Don’t know the play?  Don’t worry! This staged reading will feature drunk narration from Bard & Bourbon alumni for a one-of-a-kind night of laughs and thrills.

Featuring powerful female roles and a narcissistic king who rules by whim instead of wisdom, King John is a perfect play for our current political times.

General admission: $10

Students/Seniors/Military/Artists: $7

For tickets, visit www.BardAndBourbon.com  or https://drunkkingjohn.bpt.me


rep

The Milwaukee Generals are almost upon us, so I thought now would be a good time to revisit some thoughts on auditioning.  Here are my thoughts from a couple of years ago.  I’ve done a bit of judicial editing, but my thoughts on this process haven’t changed that much.  Hope it helps.

 

Fletcher

 

Having sat through the Milwaukee Generals for the last several years, I’ve come across all sorts of things that auditionees do which sabotage the work at hand.  I’m continually amazed by some of these gaffs, but to be fair, how could they know?  I understand just how hard and awful the process of auditioning is having been an actor for the last 35 years.  To that end I’ve decided to share some of the dos and don’ts of auditioning.  I throw in the caveat that these are strictly from my own viewpoint and that while they deal with auditioning in general, they are specific to the peculiarities of myself and the Milwaukee Generals.

 

I’m dividing this “tutorial” into three parts: the Introduction, the Headshot and Resume and the Audition.

 

The Introduction 

 

If you have the chance (and that’s a big if) take a peek at the room you are going to walk into ahead of time.  Auditioning is an intimidating thing and walking into a room blind is hateful.  Find out where the auditors are going to be sitting and figure out where you are going to sit or stand.  Find out if there is a chair available and what kind it is.  Nothing worse than preparing a piece that requires you to spin a chair around and sit on it backwards only to find out that the chair has arms.  For those of you new to the Milwaukee Generals, you are walking into a room to face a group of auditors in a horseshoe configuration. 

 

If you walk into the room and you find that there are auditors behind you, you’ve come in too far.  Back up so that we can see your face.

 

Take your time introducing yourself and your pieces.  Know that we are furiously passing your headshots around as quickly as we can, flipping them over and pouring over your resume and then trying to catch what pieces you are going to do and in many cases trying to jot that info down.  We see a lot of auditions over those couple of days and it’s extremely difficult to keep them straight.  Give us a chance to remember you.  I’ll never fault an auditionee for taking his or her time introducing their pieces.  When in doubt, wait until the majority of us have finished and are looking back up at you before you begin your first piece.

 

Don’t undress in the room.  This is a rather new phenomenon that has started happening lately.  When you walk into the room, be prepared to go.  I don’t want to see you come in, and then slowly take off a coat, scarf, shirt or any other item of clothing as you are introducing yourself.  That’s weird and distracting.  Leave that stuff outside.

 

This is for both your intro and exit; don’t apologize for your audition.  Look, you only get one shot at this, so no matter how poorly you’ve prepared or think you’ve done during the audition, do it boldly and with a smile on your face.  I can’t tell you how many people come into the room with the body language of, “Uh, hi.  I don’t really know why I’m here and I’m sorry to waste your time.”  Conversely I’ve seen a lot of people who have finished a perfectly fine audition and then ruin it by sheepishly excusing themselves on the way out.  Don’t do it!  It sucks all of the energy out of your audition.

 

Generally speaking, goofy introductions and/or exits will fall flat and have a good chance of being irritating.  I know it’s a defensive thing, but just don’t do it.  Come in, smile and introduce yourself.  When you are finished, say thank you.  Resist the urge to ask us if we have any questions or if there’s anything else we’d like to see.  Trust me; if we have those questions we won’t let you leave the room until we know the answers.

 

Give us the info we need.  It has become fashionable of late to name the play your audition is from, but not the part; or worse yet, not tell us anything at all.  This seems particularly true of Shakespeare.  Don’t make it a guessing game.  Conversely, don’t give us too much information.  In most cases I don’t need to know the author and I certainly don’t need to be told that Hamlet was written by Shakespeare.  And occasionally an auditionee will give us a summary of the piece they are about to give.  Nope, don’t do it.

 

While we are on the subject of introducing your pieces, proceed to do your pieces in the order in which they were introduced.  Different auditors are there for different reasons.  Shakespeare companies have less interest in your modern/comic piece and are waiting for the Macbeth you are going to do.  If you say you are going to do your classical piece second, do so.  They may use that brief period of time while you are performing your first piece to scan your resume and see what other classical pieces you have done and where.

 

Oftentimes the audition goes wrong during the intro.  I spend a whole day with my students having them do nothing but walking into a room and introducing themselves.  This is surprisingly difficult, and few people spend any time on that part of their audition.  Auditionees actually stumble over their names, forget what pieces they are doing, mispronounce the playwright’s name (which is just one more reason that info is unnecessary), mumble their info in such a way that we can’t understand it or turn their back and drag a chair across the room while making their intro.  Enter the room.  If you are going to use a chair make a decision; either get the chair, pick it up and set it where you want and then introduce yourself, or introduce yourself and then get set.  Trust me; we will welcome the extra time to look at your resume.

 

Unless we stand up and stick our hands out, no need to come over and shake our hands.  As I’ve stated, we’re going to a whole lot of people over the course of this very long day.  There are also upwards of twenty people in that room and you won’t want to shake all of our hands.

 

The Headshot and Resume 

 

Look like your headshot.  It’s bothersome when you don’t.  You’re a little heavier than you’d like to be?  So what.  Maybe we’re looking for just that heavy person.  It’s going to be very difficult to remember you later if you don’t look like your headshot.

 

Staple or glue your resume to your headshot.  I can’t tell you how irritating it is to get a loose resume.  Or worse yet, one in which the resume is paper-clipped to the headshot actually covering the headshot.  It does nothing but make you look unprofessional and your audition might fail right there before you even get in the room.  And take the time to trim it to fit.  I file these away and those odd sized ones just might not make it into my filing cabinet.

 

While we’re on the subject of attaching your resume, don’t attach anything else.  I’m really happy you’re currently employed with your one-man show, but I don’t want a flyer or postcard attached advertising said show.

 

Leave white space on your resume.  We’re doing everything we can to remember the interesting things about you in case we should want to cast you.  If you jamb-pack your resume from margin to margin we have no room for such notes.  It also makes them hard to read and smacks of desperation.  “Look how much I’ve done!”  We don’t need to know everything you’ve done and if you have stuff on there from twenty years ago you might think about some judicial editing.

 

Use a decent sized font.  We’re at this all day and my eyes get tired.  If you give me an 8 point font I’ll want to throw your resume in the discard pile then and there.  Also, weird or funny fonts are irritating.  It just adds an extra hurdle where I don’t need one.  And if you use comic sans I will throw your resume away.

 

There is a somewhat uniform way of setting up your resume.  Feel free to diverge, but just know that doing so will increase the likelihood that I won’t be able to find the info I’m looking for.  At the top should be your name and under that your vitals.  Height, weight, eye color, hair color, telephone and email address.  If you are a singer you may want to put your vocal range.  Do not give us your address.  In this day and age that simply isn’t safe and every now and then you send your resume to an unscrupulous person who turns around and sells your resume to other places.  Don’t include your age or tell us what your age range is.  That’s our job and why would you want to limit yourself that way?  Likewise, don’t include the dates of your productions.

 

Below your name and vitals should come the body of your resume which is your stage experience.  There are four things I want to know here: the theatre you worked at, the show you did, the part you played and who directed you.  Set them up in neat columns so that I can easily scan through them.  Don’t be afraid to list multiple shows with one theatre, that’s a good thing; that says that you worked at that theatre and they liked you enough to ask you back.  I am very leery of the auditionee that has 30 theatres listed and has only one show at each of them.

 

Below the stage experience section should be your education and special skills.  Still in high school?  It’s okay, we won’t hold it against you, so don’t be ashamed of it.  Tell us where you went to school and who some of your teachers were, but leave your GPA off.  Those names may open up a conversation.  I’m not really interested if you took a weekend class here or there.  Special skills should be special.  I don’t know how special having a driver’s license is.  Fire eating is more impressive (although at this last audition every other person had that listed) and I certainly want to know if you can speak a foreign language fluently.  I assume a good actor can learn dialects, so for me I don’t really care.

You may have a lot of film and/or TV credits; you may have a lot of directing credits.  I don’t care.  I’m here to audition stage actors.  In this day and age you should be able to have several different resumes at your disposal.  If you are coming to the Milwaukee Generals, cater your resume to your clients, which are almost exclusively theatres.

 

Have enough resumes.  We don’t like sharing.

 

Don’t lie on your resume.  You will be busted and then you’ve lost all credibility.  If you took a weekend class don’t make it sound like you received a degree.  If you took a beginning improv class don’t say you are part of the troope.  If you were Gregory in Romeo and Juliet once upon a time, don’t claim that you are a trained fighter.  You’re not.  We know, we always know.

 

The Audition 

 

So now we come to the heart of the matter.  First know that within the first ten or fifteen seconds we know if we like you or not.  Sometimes we’ve already made up our minds during the intro.  That’s just the way it goes.  Knowing that, limit the length of your pieces.  They really should be no longer than a minute a piece.  I spent one whole afternoon timing auditions.  I would look down at my watch when I started to lose interest and it was always between 55 and 65 seconds.  Even if you’re great, going beyond that is too much.  In the past, many people were going over three minutes and that was just for one of their pieces.  Leave us wanting more.

 

In picking your pieces be very selective.  If you choose something offensive it is likely to offend and turn off at least a few people in the room.  Have a really good reason for picking such a piece. Of course if you are still looking for a piece right now you are probably in trouble.

 

Don’t do stand up.  I’ve never seen it work and theatre is not stand up.  I’ve also never seen a piece that an actor has written for themselves work.

 

Contrast your pieces.  That doesn’t mean that one has to be modern comic and the other classical dramatic.  You can contrast two modern funny pieces and I will be quite delighted.  But standing during one and sitting during the other is not contrast.  Show us two different sides of yourself and hopefully those two pieces are different than your introduction.  Remember that your intro is a chance to show us a different side of yourself that will be contrasted by your two pieces.  Prove that you can act.

 

Don’t do serial killer monologues.  They are overdone and not usually all that interesting.

 

Don’t find a monologue in a monologue book.  They generally aren’t very good and they are overused.  Nothing like seeing the same bad monologue four times in the same day.  Read plays, lots of them, and find something that speaks to you.

 

People bend over backwards trying to find the obscure Shakespeare piece that no one has ever seen.  In doing so they generally go to some of Shakespeare’s lesser known plays.  You know why they are lesser known?  Because they’re not as good.  You know what I’ve never seen?  Someone audition with “To be or not to be.”

 

Don’t wear anything that is more disturbing or more interesting than you.  I’ll spend the whole audition wondering, “Why did he wear that?” instead of watching your audition.  Look nice, but make sure you are comfortable and can move around.  And unless you live in a suit and tie 24/7, don’t wear a suit and tie.  It always comes off as amateurish.

 

Your pieces should actually be scenes in which you are engaged in some kind of action as opposed to telling us a funny story.  I want to see your struggle, not your charming me with a funny anecdote.

 

Feel free to use me as your point of focus.  I will always sit in one of the corner seats for just that reason.  But know that not everyone is okay with that.  However, if you stand two feet in front of me and confront me, you’re going to lose me.  I’ll still stare straight at you and be the best audience member I can be, but I’m no longer really watching you.  I’m beginning to wonder if you’re crazy enough to jump the table and others in the room are concentrating on the same thing.

 

After you are done with a piece do not say scene.  Worse yet, do not wave your hand in front of your face and say scene.

 

Do make your transitions clear and clean.  Do something, usually a physical move, to let us know one piece has ended and the next has begun.  Of course if they are highly contrastable pieces, that shouldn’t be a problem.

 

If you have an emotional piece and are able to go to that place, good for you.  If you end that piece and take a long time coming out of it and composing yourself, showing us just how hard that was, I will no longer love you.

 

If you get off to a bad start ask if you can start over.  We will always say yes.

 

No props.  We’ll see the letter in your hand if you are invested in your scene.  And never, ever, ever…NEVER! bring a gun into the room.  Especially not one loaded with a half-charge blank which you then hold to your head and pull the trigger.  Sigh.  It now needs to be said.

 

And that’s my spiel.  I’m sure other things will come to mind and I’ll update this from time to time.  I also welcome observations from other auditors whether they agree with me or not.  Know that during the course of my stumbling career I have made many of these mistakes myself, and it was only because some kind person took me in hand that I got past some of them.  I’m still an awful auditionee.

 

Be bold and good luck.

 

Fletcher

 

P.S. The people in the room really want you to be good.  We’ve got a lot on our collective minds during the course of that very long day.  Please don’t read anything into our dour faces.  And know that if you come in with a bright smile and a chipper attitude we will immediately light up.


summit-players-660x440

Summit Players Theatre will be holding auditions for their 2019 summer Shakespeare in the State Parks tour of Romeo and Juliet on February 17th from 9am – 2pm.

We are looking to cast a diverse six member acting company who must be available for weekend and weekday evening rehearsals from mid-May to mid-June, and to tour weekends from June 14 through August 4th.

If you are interested and available, please send a picture and resume (or equivalent information) to maureen@summitplayerstheatre.com

All applicants for this energetic and physically demanding 75 minute production and accompanying workshops must be available for the entirety of the rehearsal and performance schedule.  If called in to audition, you will be contacted with an appointment time and venue location.

Details on audition criteria, rehearsal and performance schedule, and actor stipends can be found on our website:    https://www.summitplayerstheatre.com/opportunities 


AUDITION NOTICE: Hope Summer Rep is looking for Actors in Milwaukee for our 2019 Season. Sign up in link below.

Milwaukee, WI
February 14th 11-5pm

Location
Broadway Theatre Center

Actors
2 Contrasting 1 minute monologues One must be Shakespeare and One must be done w/British Accent.
32 Bars of any Musical Theatre song

*If you play an instrument, please bring it and be prepared to demonstrate skill level. Guitar, Banjo, Bass, Violin and Piano a plus. *Piano provided*

Any questions please email us at HSRTauditions@hope.edu More info on HSRT’s Season at www.hope.edu/hsrthope


pink

Pink Umbrella Theater Company is Looking for Actors!

 

Pink Umbrella Theater is a new company and the first of its kind in the city of Milwaukee.  Focusing on actors (18+) who identify with a disability, Pink Umbrella Theater provides and promotes theater that is accessible, inclusive and sensory immersive. Classes and workshops start February 2019.  Registration is now open.  Find more information at www.pinkumbrellatheater.org. Join us or share today!

 

Class Descriptions:

 

Acting:  Through theater exercises and scene work, actors will gain a better understanding of self, enhance technique and engage the imagination. This class is a collaborative and creative way to explore the art of acting.

 

Improv:  “Yes, and!” is the key to this Improvisation class. If you want to create characters, broaden your storytelling skills and utilize your imagination, this class is for you. Through a series of games and exercises, actors will increase confidence, develop communication and build trust.

 

Musical Theater:  Musical Theater is the art of combining singing, dancing and acting and this class develops each of those skills. Actors will create dynamic characters, explore dance technique and find their voice through a variety of theater exercises.

 

 

 


5-curious savage google+

Auditions for THE CURIOUS SAVAGE at Sunset Playhouse, 700 Wall Street, Elm Grove, WI 53122, 262-782-4430 SunsetPlayhouse.com.

 

Monday, January 7 & Tuesday, January 8, 2019 at 7:00 pm

Callbacks: Wednesday, January 9, 2019 (if necessary)

 

We hope to see you at the auditions. All roles are open.

 

THE CURIOUS SAVAGE will be directed by Dustin J. Martin. Auditions WILL consist of readings from the script.

 

Auditioners will be asked to fill out an Audition Information Sheet prior to auditions; one may fill this out the night of the auditions or ahead of time by downloading the Audition Sheet – THE CURIOUS SAVAGE at SunsetPlayhouse.com.

 

Rehearsals: Monday, January 21 – Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Tech Week is Friday, February 22 – Wednesday, February 27, 2019. You must be available for EVERY technical rehearsal (Friday before Opening through Preview Night) and EVERY performance to be cast in this show.

 

Performances: Thursday, February 28 – Sunday, March 17, 2019

For more information visit SunsetPlayhouse.com


EducationSecondary

Don’t forget to treat yourself while holiday shopping! Sign up for Adult Acting Classes with Milwaukee Repertory Theater!

Acting for the Camera II Begins January 7th! Sign up here: https://www.milwaukeerep.com/courses/courseregister.aspx?CourseId=41898

Basic Acting I Begins March 18nd! Sign up here: https://www.milwaukeerep.com/courses/courseregister.aspx?CourseId=42593

Please contact Auburn Matson, Education Administrator with any questions. You can reach her at amatson@milwaukeerep.com